Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]






Welcome Veterans, Friends and Family!

Photobucket
Veterans Corner

With

Michael Isam



We are proud to be able to provide up to date
news and information for all Veterans and family members


We have added a Employment section for those in need


Please check back daily for more information



Thank you for your dedication and support of our Veterans!


Please take the time to register a username and post your support
Add Reply
Thursday 08, February 2018
Topic Started: Feb 8 2018, 03:36 PM (10 Views)
michaelisam
Member Avatar
Michael Isam
[ *  *  *  *  *  *  * ]



Thanks to Kevin Secor

Please see attachment for complete details

- Thursday 08, February 2018

- Did you know:

- Pentagon says Trump ordered Washington military parade.
- What would a Trump military parade look like?.
- Senate reaches budget deal with huge defense boost.
- Two-year budget deal would raise caps, give Pentagon $700B in 2018.
- Mattis: Year-long continuing resolution would threaten troops’ pay.
- Mattis: If given a budget, 'we will spend the money wisely'.
- Will the US trade its new sub-launched cruise missile for Russian arms treaty compliance?.
- Leaders of Turkey, Russia and Iran to discuss Syria in Istanbul: Turkish source.
- Pentagon: Afghan war costing US $45 billion per year.
- Precision kits will help Army artillery rounds hit targets without GPS.
- Now Marines can opt to row instead of run for the PFT.
- The Marines Are Giving Quadcopters to Every Squad.
- Passing Combat Endurance Test is no longer required for infantry officers.
- Navy’s massive training overhaul faces long-term threat.
- Navy doing away with combat camera.
- Navy presses Mattis to delay 'shock testing' costliest carrier.
- Air Force cuts re-up bonuses for dozens of jobs — but you still have a chance to cash in.
- In the #MeToo era, military senior misconduct faces new scrutiny.
- Military leaders dispute accusations of lax punishment for senior officers.
- Pentagon misconduct complaints increase; Fewer found guilty.
- Schumer: Fort Drum, VA hospitals, farmers among Upstate NY winners in budget deal.
- See what changes could be coming to TAP.
- Long-Term Opioid Use Down Among US Vets: Study.
- Budget caps leave Army with a choice: maintain or modernize, but not both.
- Military Veterans defy Jeff Sessions, fight for medical marijuana to kick opioid addiction.
- Common drug for PTSD doesn’t stem nightmares, sleep problems in Veterans.
- Veterans Are Taking Blood Pressure Medication for PTSD – For some, that might be a mistake.
- First national studies of quality of VA mini-stroke care and how best to measure that care.
- VA Describes Strategies on Changes in Employee Rights.
- DeFazio asks VA Secretary to investigate continued retaliation.
- When VA needed landscaping and snow removal, one employee hired her brother.
- Ginnie Mae to take action against predatory lenders that target Veterans.
- VA joint loans: 7 things to know.
- Banks co-sponsoring bill to assist homeless Bets with dependents.
- VA makes progress in cyber.
- New VA Data on Discipline May Be Hint of Future.
- Bill would eliminate state Veteran ID cards in Virginia.
- Feud over service dog ends after American Airlines settles lawsuit with Army veteran.
- Going for gold: Brockton VA spinal unit residents to compete in national games.
- She’s busy. She’s happy. She’s having fun. And she’s now 100 years old.
- Veteran of the Day – Joseph Edward Brown.


Did you know:

Department of Labor awards program honors employers who hire and retain Veterans: The Department of Labor (DoL) is currently accepting applications for the beta phase of the HIRE Vets Medallion Program to recognize employers who hire and retain Veterans as employees. The program stems from the Honoring Investments in Recruiting and Employing (HIRE) American Military Veterans Act of 2017, which directs the department to “annually solicit and accept voluntary information from employers for consideration of employers to receive a HIRE Vets Medallion Award.”

The Associated Press Pentagon says Trump ordered Washington military parade. President Donald Trump has asked the Pentagon to plan a grand parade of the U.S. armed forces in Washington this year to celebrate military strength, officials said Tuesday.

Military Times What would a Trump military parade look like?. White House officials walked back reports of a massive military parade later this year, saying only that President Donald Trump has had conversations with Pentagon leaders about the possibility of such an event.

Defense News Senate reaches budget deal with huge defense boost. Senate leaders have reached a two-year deal that would set defense spending at $700 billion for 2018 and $716 billion for 2019.

DefenseOne Two-year budget deal would raise caps, give Pentagon $700B in 2018. Senators struck a budget deal Wednesday that would provide steep increases in U.S. defense spending over the next two years — up more than 15 percent in 2018 alone, the largest boost in more than a decade and a half.

Military Times Mattis: Year-long continuing resolution would threaten troops’ pay. Two days before yet another potential government shutdown, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis appeared before Congress to issue a now-familiar warning: Lawmakers’ inability to pass a budget has and will continue to hurt the troops.

Military Times Mattis: If given a budget, 'we will spend the money wisely'. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis made a rare television appearance before the White House press corps Wednesday to speak directly to the public — and perhaps, more importantly, to Capitol Hill — to convince them that anything short of a regular budget would do irreparable harm to an already cash-strapped military.

Defense News Will the US trade its new sub-launched cruise missile for Russian arms treaty compliance?. Under the recently released Nuclear Posture Review, the U.S. intends to produce a new sea-launched nuclear cruise missile ― part of a plan to directly put pressure on Russia’s nuclear forces.

Reuters Leaders of Turkey, Russia and Iran to discuss Syria in Istanbul: Turkish source. Turkey and Russia agreed on Wednesday that their next three-way summit with Iran to discuss the conflict in Syria will be held in Istanbul, a Turkish presidential source said.

The Associated Press Pentagon: Afghan war costing US $45 billion per year. Forty-five billion dollars. That’s how much the Pentagon says the Afghan war is costing American taxpayers, and with no end in sight they may have to keep footing that bill for years to come.

Army Times Precision kits will help Army artillery rounds hit targets without GPS. A new contract issued by the Army shows one of many steps the service is taking to make its artillery arsenal fire farther and more accurately with deadly effects.

Marine Corps Times Now Marines can opt to row instead of run for the PFT. Rowing is now opened to all Marines who are not capable of running during the Physical Fitness Test, or PFT.

DefenseOne The Marines Are Giving Quadcopters to Every Squad. The Corps says new robots, tech, and video games will keep Marines on the tactical edge.

Marine Corps Times Passing Combat Endurance Test is no longer required for infantry officers. In a slight change to the grueling initial stage of the 13-week Infantry Officer Course, Marines will no longer be required to pass the Combat Endurance Test to move on.

Navy Times Navy’s massive training overhaul faces long-term threat. Buried inside the Navy’s recent strategic review was an ominous warning: The Navy’s plans to transform the way sailors are trained is at risk of failure because the Pentagon is already forcing budget cuts on the ambitious multi-year effort.

Navy Times Navy doing away with combat camera. The Navy will eliminate it’s two combat camera units by Oct. 1 in an effort to cut costs and eliminate billets, Navy Times has learned.

Stars and Stripes Navy presses Mattis to delay 'shock testing' costliest carrier. The decision pits the Navy's push to have an 11-carrier fleet ready to deploy as soon as possible against warnings from the Pentagon's testing office that the USS Gerald R. Ford shouldn't be deployed for initial combat duty until it's gone through tests to determine how well it could withstand attack.


Air Force Times Air Force cuts re-up bonuses for dozens of jobs — but you still have a chance to cash in. The Air Force is cutting selective re-enlistment bonuses for 17 career fields and reducing SRBs for 19 more in fiscal 2018.

Stars and Stripes In the #MeToo era, military senior misconduct faces new scrutiny. Two hearing panels of service inspector generals and vice chairs told the committee Wednesday that they’ve seen significant progress addressing a slew of senior misconduct complaints that peaked in recent years, but plenty of work remains to finally get a handle on the problem.

Military Times Military leaders dispute accusations of lax punishment for senior officers. Military officials worked to reassure lawmakers on Wednesday that they are holding senior leaders accountable for misconduct, despite concerns from Hill Democrats that many problematic cases are simply swept aside.

Fox News Pentagon misconduct complaints increase; Fewer found guilty. The number of complaints filed against senior military and defense officials has increased over the past several years, but more cases are being rejected as not credible and fewer officers are being found guilty of misconduct, according to data from Defense Department investigators.

The Post-Standard: Schumer: Fort Drum, VA hospitals, farmers among Upstate NY winners in budget deal. The agreement provides $4 billion over two years to rebuild and repair Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals and clinics that have deferred maintenance and other critical infrastructure projects. Schumer said the upgrades and expansions will ultimately help reduce wait times at VA hospitals and clinics across Upstate New York.

Military Times See what changes could be coming to TAP. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill want service members to get more training for civilian life before transitioning out of the military.

HealthDay: Long-Term Opioid Use Down Among US Vets: Study. Recent efforts by the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to promote safe prescribing of opioid painkillers seem to be working. Opioid prescriptions by the VHA have declined since peaking in 2012, a new study finds. Key to the drop is decreases in long-term prescriptions, which carry greater risk for overdose and addiction, said the study's lead author, Katherine Hadlandsmyth.

Defense News Budget caps leave Army with a choice: maintain or modernize, but not both. The U.S. Army will once again have to shelve modernization efforts if Congress fails to break free of crippling budget caps, said the head of the service’s resourcing branch.

CNBC: Military Veterans defy Jeff Sessions, fight for medical marijuana to kick opioid addiction. Ryan Miller describes the year after his leg amputation as the best year of his life. He worked out. He traveled. He tanned. He was done with opioids. After an explosively formed projectile destroyed his leg and damaged his stomach in Iraq, Miller had been caught in a vicious cycle of surgery and prescribed painkillers. The wounded Army infantry captain would have a surgery every few months, broken up by unsuccessful physical therapy.

Reuters: Common drug for PTSD doesn’t stem nightmares, sleep problems in Veterans. The blood pressure drug prazosin, widely prescribed to relieve symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), has failed to show it can reduce distressing dreams or improve sleep quality in a trial of 304 military veterans at 13 Veterans Affairs medical centers. After 10 weeks of therapy with the generic drug, which costs about a nickel per pill, recipients had no significant reduction in recurrent nightmares or easier sleep compared to veterans receiving placebo.

Newsweek (Video): Veterans Are Taking Blood Pressure Medication for PTSD – For some, that might be a mistake. A blood pressure drug that one in six veterans with PTSD may take to control their nightmares may not work better than a placebo, new results published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggest. Despite the results, the researchers still believe the drug might work—just for some people. The study followed more than 300 people, half of whom took the drug and half of whom took a placebo, for six months.

MedicalXpress: First national studies of quality of VA mini-stroke care and how best to measure that care. The first national study of the quality of the care offered by the Veterans Health Administration to patients following a transient ischemic attack (known as a TIA and sometimes called a ministroke) reports that the largest healthcare system in the United States is providing good quality care but also identifies targets for improvement particularly for those patients discharged from the Emergency Department without being admitted to a VA hospital.

FEDweek: VA Describes Strategies on Changes in Employee Rights. Following is an excerpt from recent congressional testimony by VA secretary Dr. David Shulkin regarding how the department is carrying out changes in employee appeal rights, changes that are commonly seen as precedent for applying to other agencies. The Department of Veterans Affairs took expedient action to implement the Secretary’s new authority to hold employees accountable provided for in the Department of Veterans Affairs Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017.

The News-Reviews: DeFazio asks VA Secretary to investigate continued retaliation. U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio on Tuesday asked VA Secretary David Shulkin to investigate what he called “troubling reports of continued retaliation against whistleblowers within the VA.” In a letter, DeFazio, D-Springfield, cited the case of Eugene surgeon Scott Russi. Russi was fired from the VA last year and alleged he was still being retaliated against in January, shortly after federal VA investigators had interviewed hundreds of VA employees about whistle-blower retaliation.

The Washington Post: When VA needed landscaping and snow removal, one employee hired her brother. When the Bedford, Mass., VA Medical Center spent hundreds of thousands of dollars hiring landscapers and ordering rock salt, mulch and crushed stone, one whistleblower in the department found it suspicious that the supplies never showed up. Turns out they were never delivered, and an employee had steered the contract to her brother’s landscaping business, according to a recent investigation by the Office of Special Counsel…

Stars and Stripes: Ginnie Mae to take action against predatory lenders that target Veterans. Two weeks ago, Ginnie Mae warned lenders would be disciplined for aggressively targeting and pressuring veterans to refinance their home loans. Later this week, the government corporation plans to take action. Ginnie Mae, formally known as the Government National Mortgage Association, amended its guidelines at the end of January…

Military Times (Home HQ): VA joint loans: 7 things to know. If your name won’t be the only one on your mortgage, you may need to do a bit more homework when it comes to the VA loan process. Eligibility requirements and basic paperwork needs won’t change, but other portions of the path between offer sheet and closing may have a few more hurdles.

Hartford City News-Times: Banks co-sponsoring bill to assist homeless Bets with dependents. Congressman Jim Banks (IN-03), a member of the House Veterans Affairs Committee, has announced he is cosponsoring the Homeless Veteran Families Act, bipartisan legislation that aims to assist community agencies with housing costs to help homeless veterans with dependents.

WFED (AM-1500, Audio): VA makes progress in cyber. Federal agencies increasingly face more sophisticated cyber threats, so it makes sense the Veterans Affairs Department remains committed to protecting veteran information. In September 2015, VA’s Office of Information and Technology sent to Congress its Enterprise Cybersecurity Strategy meant to further strengthen and protect the VA cyber environment.

FEDweek: New VA Data on Discipline May Be Hint of Future. The agency previously had reported on serious disciplinary actions–removal, downgrade or suspension of more than 14 days–against employees who had completed their probation periods, data that showed that the rate more than doubled after passage in mid-year of the VA Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act.

Stars and Stripes Bill would eliminate state Veteran ID cards in Virginia. A Virginia delegate has proposed ditching a state-issued Veteran ID Card in lieu of a veteran designation on a driver’s license. Virginia is one of the few states remaining with a separate ID for veterans and each costs $10.

Stars & Stripes Feud over service dog ends after American Airlines settles lawsuit with Army veteran. American Airlines has settled a 2016 lawsuit filed by an Army veteran who complained that the company had mistreated her because of her service dog.

The Enterprise: Going for gold: Brockton VA spinal unit residents to compete in national games. That is, until he met his therapist at the Belmont Street medical facility. Now, this summer, he’ll fly to Orlando to compete in his fifth National Veterans Wheelchair Games. The games, which are being held from July 30 to Aug. 4 this year, bring together disabled veterans from across the country for five days of Olympic-style competition.

Stars and Stripes She’s busy. She’s happy. She’s having fun. And she’s now 100 years old. As Millie Dunn Veasey — a military and civil rights pioneer and member of the greatest generation — celebrated her 100th birthday, the inevitable question came up. What’s her secret for living a long, productive life?

Dept of Veterans Affairs Veteran of the Day – Joseph Edward Brown. Army Veteran Joseph Edward Brown. Joseph served for three months in 1945 during World War II and again from 1950 to 1957 during the Korean War. In an interview with the Veterans History Project, Joseph discussed his life and military career. He was born in Washington D.C. in November 1926 and grew up in Bladensburg, Maryland. He credits his maternal great-grandfather, a relative of Frederick Douglass, and grandmother with raising and instilling his strong values and principles of love after his mother died in childbirth. Joseph graduated high school in June 1945 and was drafted into the Army the following month. He was sworn into the service at Fort Meade, Maryland and trained as a pilot in Sheppard Field, Texas.

Joseph was discharged in October after the end of the war and enrolled at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina. He graduated as a pre-med student in 1950 and was again drafted into the Army in June. Joseph was assigned to one of the first integrated basic training units at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Though he faced racial discrimination during his first term in the Army, he was selected to attend advanced training and leadership school due to his educational background.

After his training, Joseph was assigned to Korea and served in the medical detachment of the 74th Engineer Combat Battalion before being promoted to supervisor of the unit. While supervisor, he chose to give medical treatment to native civilians in enemy territory. He was once separated from his unit for two days and was forced to hide in bunkers and foxholes, but largely credits his training at leadership school and his upbringing for surviving. After his discharge, Joseph wrote a memoir entitled Black Soldier of Mercy. Joseph passed away on July 2, 2013. We honor your service, Joseph.


###


Attached to this post:
Attachments: Did_you_know.docx (53.24 KB)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
DealsFor.me - The best sales, coupons, and discounts for you
« Previous Topic · Veteran's Today · Next Topic »
Add Reply



Theme designed by
Frostbitee