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Viewing Single Post From: The giant space ship example
gbaikie

I looking at dwarf sky.
I used just nitrogen and 37 tonnes liquid N2 per square meter is 3 times mass
as earth:
For dwarf with .3 need about 30 meters liquid nitrogen: 1:694:
http://chemistry.about.com/od/moleculescompounds/a/liquidnitrogen.htm
And: "At normal pressure, liquid nitrogen boils at 77 K (-195.8°C or -320.4°F)."
Also: density: 0.808 [need 37 meter instead of 30]
If air is 1 nitrogen gas is 0.9737
cubic meter of air is 1.2929 kg/m3 dry and 0 C. Nitrogen gas is 1.26 kg per m3
Pipe has 1 cubic meter per meter length
So have, pipe horizontal or zero gee:
37 times 694 is 25,678 meters at 77 K at 1 atm.
Double temperature twice it's volume:
154 K and 51,356 meters
And 283 K is 94,495 at 1 atm. 14.7 psi
1 psi is 1,389,076.5
1/10 psi is 13,890,765

When vertical on 1/10 gravity world:
1/100th 13,890,765 is
138,907.65
So 37 meter liquid is 30 tonnes which weighs 3000 kg on 1/10 gravity
99% of 3000 kg is 2930 kg 2970 kg
On earth 30,000 kg of atmosphere would make 14.7 times 3 or 44.1 psi
4.41 psi bottom and minus .0441 psi or 4.365 psi at at top 1% section
Plus starting .1 psi before any gravity.
So give 4.51 psi bottom and minus .0441 psi which is 4.466

from gravity the 1/10th pressure, starts from 1/10 and doubles: 2/10/, 4/10, 8/10th 16/10th, 32/10th. Being 3.2 psi. And times by 40% gives 4.5 psi

So taking one section which 1% of entire length and
at .1 psi with 138,907.65 length, half length gives .2 psi at 69,454 meters
.4 psi is 34727 meters. .8 is 17,363 meters. .8 is 8682 meters
1.6 psi is 4341 and 3.2 is 2170 meter and finally 1550 meters gives 4.51 psi at bottom.
As pressure decreases from 4.51 psi to 3.2 psi the length will go from 1550 meters
to 4341 meters.
The following 15 of the 100 138,907.65 meter lengths which goes from the bottom
part of section starting at 4.51 to 3.88 psi. Which length range of 1550 to 3580 meters.
Or roughly adding 135. Or say start 120 add 3
1550 elevation meters Pressure Density .4516 kg per cubic meter
***************
1670 *--* 3220 *--* 4.46 *--* .4192 kg/m3
1793 *--* 5013 *-- * 4.42 *--* .3904
1919 *--* 6932 *--* 4.38 *--* .3648
2048 *--* 8980 *--* 4.34 *--* .3418
2177 *--* 11,157 *--* 4.3 *--* .3215
2311 *--* 13,468 *--* 4.26 *--* .3029
2448 *--* 15,916 *--* 4.22 *--* .2859
2588 -- 18,504 -- 4.18 -- .2705
2731 -- 21,235 -- 4.14 -- .2563
2877 -- 24,112 -- 4.10 -- .2433
3026 -- 27,138 -- 4.06 -- .2313
3178 -- 30,316 -- 4.02 -- .2203
3333 -- 33,649 -- 3.99 -- .2100
3490 -- 37,139 -- 3.95 -- .2006
3650 -- 40,789 -- 3.91 -- .1918

First section has 70 kg weigh or 700 kg of nitrogen
700 divide by 1550 is .4516 kg per cubic meter.
The other section would also have 700 kg
Edit: made mistake it's 30,000 kg and 1/100th
of this per section. Hmm. "99% of 3000 kg is 2930 kg"
Oh, should been 99% of 30,000 which 29,700.
So 300 kg, so need to times density .4285 to correct.
Drats.
So ground level has .1935 kg/m3 and 40,789 meter has
.0821 kg/m3.
A lot less dense then I thought it would be- the original
numbers were less but now even more the case.
Oh density would increase as temperature drops, at 40,000
even with low lapse rate it should be quite significant.
And 85% of atmosphere is above 40,000 meter.
So the average temperature of entire atmosphere would be very low.
So to be clear those density are not adjusted for temperature. It
would correct if temperature was 283 K

Earth has 1.29 kg per square meter at sea level at 0 C
"At sea level and at 15°C according to ISA (International Standard Atmosphere), air has
a density of approximately 1.225 kg/m3" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Density_of_air
By about 7000 it is about half, or .6 kg per cubic meter
And Density at 16 km is around .16 kg per cubic meter:
http://www.pdas.com/m1.html
Edited by gbaikie, Dec 13 2011, 12:01 AM.
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