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Nobel Prize 2016
Topic Started: Aug 19 2016, 06:46 PM (17,808 Views)
Didi
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As MAO mentions, its been a quiet year for speculations

His take:

http://www.complete-review.com/saloon/index.htm#xd5

(and shigekuni has mentioned his picks as well )


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Didi
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Bjorn
Sep 9 2016, 05:10 PM
I actually wouldn't be surprised if Krasznahorkai gets it pretty soon (though hopefully not this year, I'm hoping for a non-European for a change). Yes, he's still productive and still not exactly in his dotage, but they have given it to several sub-60 writers recently, and 62 is by no means too young to get it. Though hopefully he'll be writing for many years yet, obviously.

I think you are right and even next year especially if his latest Báró Wenckheim hazatér lives up to expectations (which I am sure it will) and is commissioned to be translated for the Academy.
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Bloß ein Língshān
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I don't want to toot our own horns, but I wonder if it was some of the digging we did last year; I recall posting snippets from Englund's library thing (or something similar), as well as Göran's blog, and it's not inconceivable someone (either on the Academy or connected) has seen MAO's site, which has linked to here and WLF, thereby propelling them to be quieter on the media side. Or perhaps Danius' health has taken time from her otherwise posting abstruse clues on a blog? Or I'm discerning details that aren't there, that too.

Last year's thread was very good, however, so as an archival aspect, there's not much more to add this year, excepting obituaries occluding candidates.
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Cleanthes
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Didi, thank you for those links. Shigekuni's picks are very good. I disagree with his poetry choices, but that is a matter of taste.

His English language fiction candidates are very interesting. Murnane winning the Nobel would mean that his work is finally made widely available. Ngugi wa Thiong’o richly deserves the prize.

Being a fan of Sarduy, and having recently been wowed by Glissant, perhaps I should try Shigekuni's highly recommended Wilson Harris. Maybe Patrick Chamoiseau's also merits consideration.

Hard to disagree with Shigekuni's German picks: Handke, Jirgl and Marcel Beyer (Ulli Lust's comics version of Beyer's Flughunde is all I've read of his work, but it was really good, so Today I started reading Kaltenburg). Shigekuni's other European candidates are very good too, Krasznahorkai, Cartarescu, Ferrante and Juan Goytisolo (some would replace him with Marias, based on age). Perhaps Olga Torkaczuk is missing from that list. Despite the number of outstanding Russian writers (Sharov, Shishkin, Pelevin, etc.), I'm not sure they exactly fit the Nobel's "idealistic/witness" criterion. On the other hand, Shigekuni's other English language fiction recommendation, Buchi Emecheta seems to better fit that criterion.
Edited by Cleanthes, Sep 19 2016, 11:14 AM.
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suzannahhh
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Marcel's pick of Nathaniel Mackey
is right on
it would be a wonderful choice!!!
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Didi
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More from the vault from 1950 :

“The inference is plain that Nobel intended his Prizes to go to men (add: or women) in young or middle life, men (add: or women) whose major work lay ahead of them; it is equally clear that he thought of Literature as a moral force….In retrospect, one wonders if the Prize Awards in Literature have actually carried out what Nobel had in mind when he wrote his will.”

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1950/10/winning-the-nobel-prize/305480/

generally agree with Cleanthes on Shigekuni's picks (but having less exposure on the Germans there) and you must absolutely read Wilson, but cannot see him winning unfortunately. Nice piece on Murakami via link. .
Edited by Didi, Sep 19 2016, 06:24 PM.
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redhead
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Ironically most authors who won it mid-career went on to never publish anything worthwhile again.
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Didi
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yes, fair observation red
as you imply there were exceptions, a few examples may be William Faulkner (won a couple of Pulitzers after the Nobel), Thomas Mann (eg Joseph) and Marquez (eg Love in the Time of Cholera)
Edited by Didi, Sep 19 2016, 08:06 PM.
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http://conversationalreading.com/do-writers-do-good-work-after-the-nobel-prize/
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redhead
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I might have been too harsh when I said nothing worthwhile, but even the works the author of that article brings up are a far cry from the works that won them the prize, imo.

Also, Eugene O'Neill and W.B. Yeats are legends to be reckoned with, penning their most famous writings after the award.
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Didi
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a few changes in last Ladbrokes update, the most unusual was Adunis who pushed closer to Murakami before a sudden post update adjustment hours later to 25/1. Out of favour according to this.
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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suzannahhh
Sep 19 2016, 10:12 AM
Marcel's pick of Nathaniel Mackey
is right on
it would be a wonderful choice!!!
yes!

Not I was post Nobel.
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Uemarasan
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I think I prefer The Birdcage's list. I tried reading some of Mackey's poetry, and he strikes me as at best a decidedly minor poet. Then again, I don't have a high opinion of contemporary American poetry to begin with. A choice on par with shigekuni's overly PC tendencies, though.
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Didi
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Nathaniel Mackey may not be who I think may win nor a personal favourite (although his fiction is impressive and v5 of Broken Bottle.. is out soon) but I doubt he can be classified as minor. Birdcage has an impressive list, that is clear, but its weakness is not (purposely, for reasons explained) including any North American authors or UK authors (and inadvertently Mexican authors).

Shigekuni’s inclusion of one of the most underrated greats, old as he may be, and also an extraordinary German author I am getting acquainted with wins me. With the former, I would be very pleased if he won it, very, but cannot see it happening, even Walcott’s nomination may have been potentially directed towards Jamaica.
Edited by Didi, Sep 20 2016, 07:37 PM.
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Bjorn
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Danius on Twitter: The 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature to be announced on October 6.
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mandm
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Didi
Sep 9 2016, 05:46 PM
A noted critic and speculator in the past has mentioned that Jamaica Kincaid is a consideration a couple of times.
The same critic has mentioned Sofi Oksanen, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Marie Darrieussecq, Marilynne Robinson in the same vein.

All women and three outside Europe. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is potentially too young. That leaves Marilynne and Jamaica as strong possibilities in my opinion.

I await Maria's thoughts this year. She was right again last year.
Surely Adichie is too young?
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mandm
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I repeat: Edna O'Brien.
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Looks like Danius deleted her tweet rapidly (or even her entire account?).

Stealing this from WLF because I find it worthwhile:

Quote:
 
2015, winner Svetlana Aleksijevitj:
Opens at 5, on the 7th goes to 3.

2014, winner Patrick Modiano:
Added at 14 on the 3rd, on the 6th goes to 10.

2013, winner Alice Munro:
Opens at 12, on the 7th goes to 4.

2012, winner Mo Yan
opened at 22, on the 4th went to 8

2011, winner Tranströmer
opened at 9:2, ended at 4:6

2010, winner Vargas Llosa
opened at/ went early on to 25 and stayed there until the very end

2009, winner Müller
opened at 50, went to 3/1 during the days before the announcement

2008, Le Clezio
opened at 12 (?), moved to 2/1 close to the end


Which means that only in two cases (Müller and Modiano) the winner was not a favorite from early on. So it is very likely that the winner is among these people:

Haruki Murakami 5/1
Ngugi Wa Thiong'o 7/1
Philip Roth 8/1
Ismail Kadare 16/1
Joyce Carol Oates 16/1
Javier Marias 16/1
Jon Fosse 20/1
Laszlo Krasznahorkai 20/1
Adunis 25/1
Peter Handke 25/1
Peter Nadas 25/1
Amos Oz 25/1
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Cleanthes
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Re Murakami, Roth and Oates: I can't, I can't even (like Dylan once said).
Thiong'o, Kadare, Marias, Krasznahorkai and Handke : cool!

Peter Nadas, Jon Fosse and Amos Oz I haven't read; so I have nada to say about them, except that Nadas' books twice defeated me.

Adunis is a poet, and it's foolish to judge a poet's merit based upon translations of his poetry. "Man is a book ceaselessly being read by life; death reads him up at the last moment, once and for all." "Reality is the most wilted flower in the garden of language". "No words are exchanged during the couplings of fire and water, just long sighs, steamy embraces and extinguishment" .
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From an article in 1944, http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/14/books/nobel-in-literature-goes-to-kenzaburo-oe-of-japan.html?pagewanted=all

Quote:
 
Because the three previous winners -- Derek Walcott, Nadine Gordimer and Ms. Morrison -- write in English, speculation before today's announcement had centered on authors from Europe or Asia. Among those considered in the running were the Belgian poet, playwright and novelist Hugo Claus, who writes in Flemish; the German novelist and playwright Peter Handke; the Dutch novelist Cees Nooteboom; the Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer; the Japanese novelist Shusaku Endo, and the Irish poet Seamus Heaney.


Claus and Endo are dead; Transtromer and Heaney received the prize; hear ye, hear ye for the year of Handke or Nooteboom.
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