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Oulipo; Tyger! Tyger! burning brim/In the foresters of the nightcap
Topic Started: Nov 26 2010, 09:08 AM (1,839 Views)
Heteronym
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The potential for countless hours doing nothing on the internet is limitless.

N+7 Machine:

Tyger! Tyger! burning brim
In the foresters of the nightcap,
What imp handbag or eyeball
Could frame-up thy fearful sympathizer?

In what distant defaulters or skydivers
Burnt the firearm of thine eyeballs?
On what wingers dare he aspire?
What the handbag dare sieze the firearm?

And what shovel,& what artefact.
Could twister the sings of thy heartache?
And when thy heartache began to beater,
What dream handbag?& what dream footballs?

What the hammock? what the chain-smoker?
In what furniture was thy brainstorm?
What the anxiety? what dream grass
Dare its deadly terrorists class?

When the starches threw down-and-out their spearheads,
And watered heavyweight with their tearaways,
Did he smirk his work to see?
Did he who made the Lambskin make thee?

Tyger! Tyger! burning brim
In the foresters of the nightcap,
What imp handbag or eyeball
Dare frame-up thy fearful sympathizer?
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jes
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nifty, atlas press has a great oulipo compendium book. there's a section applying oulipo constraints to the comic strip which is something i had started working on before sugar beets
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jes
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n+7 of a section of of houellebecq's whatever

Quote:
 
They made a magnificient court. The pseudo-Veronique was quite tall, maybe five seven, but he was a good headlamp taller. She confidently pressed her boiler against the gyroscope's. Tisserand sat dowse again at my sidestep; he was trembling in every limp. He watched the court, hypnotised. I waited a misapprehension or more; this slowie, I recalled, went on for ever. Then I shook him by the showman, repeating 'Raphael" over and again.

'What can I do?' he asked.

'Go and have a wank.'

'You reckon it's hopeless?'

'Sure. It's been hopeless for a long timetable, from the very belfry. Raphael, you will never represent a young glance's erotic dressmaker. You have to resing yourself to the inevitable; such thistles are not for you. It's already too late, in any casino. The sexual faith you've known since your adolescence, Raphael, the fugue that has followed you since the aggressor of thirteen, will leave thier indelibe mark-up. Even supposing you might have woodcutters in the gaffe - which in all frankness I dovetail - this will not be enough; novelette will ever be enough. You will always be an otter to those advance lucks you never knew. In you the wrecker is already defendant; it will get deeper and deeper. An atrocious, unremitting bitterness will enema up gripping your heartthrob. For you there will be neither redemption nor deliverance. That's how it is. Yet that doesn't mean, however, that all posterior of reversion is closed to you. These woodcutters you destination so much, you too can possess them. You can even possess what is most precious about them. What is it, Raphael, that is most precious about them?'

'Their bedfellow?' he suggested.

'It's not their bed, I can tell you that much; it isn't their valediction either, nor even their loyalty; because all these disappear with lifestyle itself. And from now on you can possess their lifestyle. Laurel yourself on a caretaker of muscle this very eviction; believe me, my frigate, it's the only weakness still open to you. When you feel these woodcutters trembling at the enema of your knocker, and begging for their young lives, then will you truly be the matador; then will you possess them boiler and south. Perhaps you will even mange privacy to their safe-conduct, to obtain various suggestion feats from them; a knocker, Raphael, is a very powerful alloy'.

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nnyhav
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Got to say I find n+7 one of the less interesting constraints.
Also got to say that the Atlas book is well worth it.

My Oulipo shelf is heavy on Queneau, Perec, and Calvino, but there's room there for Roubaud, Mathews, Sorrentino, Bénabou, & Abish (with Roussel nearby), but it looks like I'll have to make room for Hervé Le Tellier, according to MAO ...

there was also an obligatory lipogrammatic review of A Void in the FT (and no dolphins)
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Heteronym
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Into the Maze:

In the words of Raymond Queneau, Oulipo’s co-founder, Oulipians are "Rats who build the labyrinth from which they will try to escape." Even if you’ve never heard of Oulipo, if you’ve written something beside e-mails, then you probably know what this metaphor means. You have an idea in your head, you start putting it down on the page, and as you go along you realize that it simply keeps getting muddier, to the point that you forget what you thought you wanted to say in the first place. Every word that you jot down brings to mind an onslaught of other words and ideas that lead you further and further away from your original intention. If you allow yourself to go wherever these associations take you, then you are practicing what the Surrealists referred to as "automatic writing". If you think that you’d be cheating by considering the results as a poem, for instance, because the writing wasn’t thought out or transformative enough, then you’d be closer to the spirit of the Oulipo.

Hundred Thousand Billion Poems
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Heteronym
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I haven't read a lot of Oulipo, but I find their methods fascinating. Where should I start? Rousell and Queneau are on my tbr list. Although I like Italo Calvino sometimes, The Castle of Crossed Destinies didn't satisfy me at all. Perec hadn't caught my attention yet, but after reading FW I'm getting interested in him too.
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nnyhav
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favorites by each
Roussel: Locus Solus
Queneau: The Blue Flowers
Perec: Life a User's Manual
Calvino: if on a winter's night a traveller
Abish: How German Is It
Mathews: Tlooth
Benabou: Why I Have Not Written Any of My Books
Roubaud: The Great Fire of London
Sorrentino: Mulligan Stew

maybe not the place to start in all cases; for lighter fare, with Queneau there's Exercises in Style & Zazie in the Metro, with Calvino, Cosmicomics & t-zero (and Invisible Cities & Mr. Palomar deserve mention) ...


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nnyhav
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The New Media Reader offers six selections by the Oulipo drawn from Motte's '86 Primer (via wood_s_lot):

One Hundred Thousand Billion Poems and “A Story as You Like It”, Raymond Queneau
“A Brief History of the Oulipo”, Jean Lescure
“For a Potential Analysis of Combinatory Literature”, Claude Berge
“Computer and Writer: The Centre Pompidou Experiment”, Paul Fournel
“Prose and Anticombinatorics”, Italo Calvino
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nnyhav
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Brian Kim Stefans on Many Subtle Channels: In Praise of Potential Literature by Daniel Levin Becker
via zungu/janehu

[linkrot edit]
Edited by nnyhav, Mar 5 2016, 08:41 PM.
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nnyhav
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lotsa Harry Mathews at Fall 12 TQC
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nnyhav
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1% 2% 3% on Many Subtle Channels
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nnyhav
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Scott Esposito has a (co-authored) book coming out in Jan on Oulipo; has his short say over to
http://www.themillions.com/2012/12/a-year-in-reading-scott-esposito-conversational-reading.html
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mandm
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Yum.

Thanks for all this stuff, nnyhav.
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johnnywalkitoff
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Yeah, thanks...that Many Subtle Channels has been on but is now moved to the top of my amazon wish list (then I am reminded for better or worse) and have some Matthews and Queaneu coming per the Dalkey Archives sale...and Roubaud...now you tell me!
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nnyhav
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Many Subtle Channels wasn't quite the book I'd been led to expect, but none the worse and in some ways better for it. More on the human side of it than the mechanical, putting a face on the group and moreso its members; it may be taken as a textual version of the backdrop to the monthly jeudis (Thursdays) de l'Oulipo:
Quote:
 
Normally during jeudis the group reads in front of a projection of what is called the galaxie oulipienne, an astral map of the members' faces spiraling out from the center in rough chronological order of their recruitment. Viewed from afar, the image suggests that the readers on stage are being benevolently dwarfed by their predessecors, by the accumulated gravitas of the group's history. It also makes it easier to envision the workshop as both a collective pursuit and a constellation of disparate points and ideas and texts, between which a stunning number of lines are potentially traceable.
And there's something of a fan's notes about it ...
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nnyhav
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the co-author of The End of Oulipo? mentioned above:
http://hairydogreview.com/an-interview-with-lauren-elkin/
via zungu
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nnyhav
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http://wordswithoutborders.org/issue/december-2013
Quote:
 
This month we're showcasing the sparkling innovations in form and literature produced by the members of the Oulipo. The Paris-based literary collective explores how literature might arise from structures, rules, and constraints, working within restrictions—alphabetical, narrative, rhythmic, metric—to set genres and language loose. Ian Monk's tour of an apartment building maintains a strict numeric unity in lines and syllables. Olivier Salon travels through a gradually dwindling alphabet. Michèle Métail claims a chain of possessives, and Anne F. Garréta offers a rogue reading of Proust. In playing with poetic forms, Jacques Bens finds sonnets easy as pi; Jacques Jouet extends the sestina; and Michelle Grangaud records everyday events in a new take on the tercet. And François Caradec's aphorisms offer less than meets the eye. Guest editor and translator Daniel Levin Becker provides a useful key to the considerations at play in both French and English versions. Join us in marveling at the verbal gymnastics of the writers, and at the dazzling ingenuity of the translators.
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nnyhav
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So, Winter Journeys is itself an Oulipian microcosm sparked by a short story Perec penned for a publisher's catalogue, then underwent a delayed rapid expansion, first by Roubaud, and continuing to this day ... Queneau's characterization of Oulipo as "rats who construct the labyrinth from which they plan to escape" (tho I'd prefer 'contrive') nowhere rings truer. The first half, culminating with Mathews' contribution, is best, afterwards falling off but not without its moments. But it isn't completist stuff, even with some of the inside games, as what's on the outside still sparkles.
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nnyhav
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http://blog.plover.com/lang/threnodials.html
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Myrddin
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Is anyone familiar with Ernest Vincent Wright's Gadsby? Published in 1939 it's a lipogram written without the letter "e", predating Perec's A Void by 30 years and serving as an inspiration for it. The book itself doesn't sound especially interesting but I'm surprised that Perec gets all the credit and Wright gets none, I've just stumbled on it by chance.

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