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What book are you reading now?
Topic Started: Dec 3 2006, 09:07 PM (253,714 Views)
SFG75
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Casual reader
[ * ]
I'm reading Martin Edens by Jack London. The book is autobiographical in that London's character is like him in many ways. Martin is a roughneck sailor with poor manners who meets a *cultured* lady and her family. Through her, he desires to become more educated, as well as to perhaps win her over. This is one of London's lesser works, but it is very interesting to read. I'm about half way through the book and it's very worthwhile. I purchased this one from a used bookstore and did so after completing a slim Willa Cather work. I hate to be "between" books. :D
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ions
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Lost at sea
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Ulysses, James Joyce. First reading.
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kl0pper
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Allahu akbar
[ *  *  * ]
Rereading The Recognitions by William Gaddis

and reading for the first time: Maldoror by Comte de Latreaumont
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onefatman
Unregistered

Rereading Merleau-Ponty: Phenomenology of Perception. Reading AtD (slowly, savouring it). Also Reading Thomas Hardy: Jude the obscure. Can't believe I've not read that before.
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ireneadler
Literary lunatic
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AtD, the Sherlock Holmes-stories (for the umpteenth time). A. D. Damasio's "Decartes Error". Finnegans Wake. David Sedaris and Kurt Tucholsky (a very good German author, don't know if he's translated into English - if, try to get ahold of him!)

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ireneadler
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
sorry, hate to make mistakes like that: it's "DeScartes' Error" (must have been the title that confused me:-) A book worth reading if you're interested in "Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain".
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suzannahhh
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Forum junkie
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AtD - which has pretty much put into hibernation these others
but not entirely

Octavio Paz - Sor Juana
W. Faulkner - Go Down Moses (reread)
Marc Seifer - Wizard - Life & Times of Nikola Tesla
Borges - Labyrinths (reread)
Amitav Ghosh - In an Antique Land: History in the Guise oof a Traveler's Tale

and now and always
finnegans wake

[irene - the Damsio books - all of them
are EXCELLENT)

oppps unintentional omitted
Robert Fagles new translation of the Aeneid
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ireneadler
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
if you like Damasio, you might also like Oliver Sacks' books....
how's the book about Tesla? He sure must have been an interesting person...
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suzannahhh
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yeah irene
I did like Sacks' books
at a not too distant point
in my checkered professional life
I worked with some neurologists who
worked with him

and if you liked them
then you should also try
Stephen Mithen - The Prehistory of the Mind: the cognitive origins
of Art and Science
and

After the Ice: A Global Human History 20,000-5000 BC

pplus he has a new one out
The Singing Neanderthals which I have not yet read

and definitely Julian Jaynes - Origins of COnsciousness in the Bi-Cameral Mind

all highly speculative
but wonderful ideas to think about

I have a shitload of books here
on Mind and the development/evolution of consciousness
and other likeminded subjects

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ireneadler
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
wow, thanks Suzannah -
that is really helpful. I'm reading up on Cognitive Science right now,
trying to figure out how I can link it with literary theory- which I'm quite
certain to be possible. So, if you have any other idea upon the subject, I'd
be very grateful to hear about it. (I have also started on the metaphor-related
works by Lakoff, Turner, etc - fits in nicely with what I've done on that subject
already; but metaphors are not exactely my cup of tea.)
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orlando
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Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
I'm reading Vineland, which I have nearly finished having got stuck for ages about half way. Also Howard's End by Forster which I find both good and yet also sometimes annoying and also reading a book on mindfulness by Thich nhat Hanh which a friend leant me and is beautifully written. I'm also reading quite a lot of poetry especially Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Larkin and 'Rich' by Craig Raine which I got second hand and will be looking for more by him.
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suzannahhh
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Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
but metaphors are not exactely my cup of tea.)

BUT WOW
how can that BE!!!!
as far as I'm concerned
metaphor making is THE defining uniqueness
of we the species

Read all of Marina Warner's books
and Robert Calasso's

Calvert Watkins' How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics
Paul Friedrich's The Meaning of Aphrodite
Gerogio de Santillana and Hertha Von Dechend's Hamlet's Mill
Lakoff (along with Lakoff and all the et alias)
is good

how can you say that about metaphor:
what doesn't accrue meaning by comparison
to something else?

and is not Iceland Spar
itself a metaphor
for
altered perception
altered realities

everything is connected
and the thread through this cosmic labyrinth
is metaphor

[just my opinion]
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charlieolson
Newbie
Currently,

Tea in the Harem by Mehdi Charef
Singularties by Susan Howe
Eecchhooeess by N. H. Pritchard
Gravity's Rainbow (put on hold a few years back when class started and just got back to it)
Codes Appearing by Michael Palmer
Going Places by Leonard Michaels (finally returned after nearly a year of being borrowed)

Carlin
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WilliamTwellman
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skull-walker
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Well, Against the Day is a jugganut, trying to make it a one book month. Although I've been flipping through "The Mezzanine" by Nicholson Baker and re-reading parts of "Cadenza for the Schniedermann Violin Concerto" by Joshua Cohen which is effing mazing in my humble opinion. Pick it up if you like concert music at all.
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ireneadler
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
@suzannah

oh, all those metaphors we live by...
-tounge in cheek, of course! But since I've started to deal with metaphors
theoretically, I've realised that I'm no longer able to say what a metaphor really
is - and that bugs me :-)) but looking up... I'm not going to stop thinking about
how and why metaphors work (and maybe even what they are) just because of that!
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jerryfatheart
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Acolyte
[ *  * ]
Just Against the Day.
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suzannahhh
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Forum junkie
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irene___

I've bveen a metaphor lover most of my conscious l;ife
but what really convinced me
was the work I did professionally
of which I am most proud

I asaw about 70 women in therapy
diagnosed as Borderline Personality Disordered

and in the seven or so years I spent with them
collectively and individually
THE amulet from my medicine poucgh
were all metaphors

and when I left MAdison (Wisconsin) where this occurred
many of them no longer fit the diagnostic categories
and NONE of them
resortewd to self mutilation
many stopped therapty alotgether
and many for the first tikme in their lives
where in healty intimacie

I made up metaphors and fairy tales for them
which allowed us to get around the Great Wall of Denial

should anyone be interested in particulars
I can give them
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ireneadler
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
@suzannah

sure I'm interested!
you know, I started to read Mark Turner's "The Literary Mind" today.... and I
think he's right: "Narrative imagining - story - is the fundamental instrument of thought. Rational capacities depend on it."
Stories keep the world together... if they are literary or not. (But to some people even more so if they ARE literary :-)
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suzannahhh
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Forum junkie
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love your banana, jerry . . .
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R.Wilder
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Acolyte
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Against the Day, 400 pages in, what a feast.
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