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Poetry; what? me poet?
Topic Started: Dec 20 2006, 06:59 AM (41,028 Views)
Funhouse
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Perpetually Lost
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Marcel Inhoff: reviews Ben Mazer at The Journal of Poetics Research

Great review. Want to get my hands on the book.
Edited by Funhouse, Jul 19 2017, 07:43 AM.
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nnyhav
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itinerant kibitzer
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http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/07/31/can-poetry-change-your-life Menand on Robbins, Zapruder, Lerner

Zapruder excerpt: https://thewalrus.ca/what-my-fathers-death-taught-me-about-poetry/

add: another: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/08/14/advice-how-to-drift-through-poems/

Edited by nnyhav, Aug 14 2017, 04:20 PM.

add: yet another: http://lithub.com/what-poetry-can-teach-us-about-power/
Edited by nnyhav, Aug 16 2017, 11:57 AM.
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kline19
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Funhouse
Jul 19 2017, 07:42 AM
Marcel Inhoff: reviews Ben Mazer at The Journal of Poetics Research

Great review. Want to get my hands on the book.
I agree. I also read the two poems linked off of the review.
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nnyhav
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http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/2017/07/books/nonfic/arts-humanities/poetry-beyond-the-basics-twelve-new-collections-offer-fresh-perspective-on-the-human-experience/
nevahoidadem
via harriet
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nnyhav
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itinerant kibitzer
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To celebrate Jorie Graham's winning the Wallace Stevens Prize for lifetime achievement from the Academy of American Poets, William Logan has a go at her (and Ashbery, and Carson, and)
Quote:
 
As her subjects became the Great Issues of the Day, the style degraded into a twitchy, obsessive record of thought, not a stream but a stuttering of consciousness, like Joyce without brains[...]
Graham has become queen of run-on thought, her poems now no more than phrases strung along the line, with punctuation for clothespins. Her books continue to be visited by outbreaks of bizarre punctuation, and Fast will be no disappointment to virologists—the new poems are frequently infested by little arrows [...] The lines seem to have stumbled into a museum devoted to the martyrdom of St. Sebastian. Nothing ties the tsunami of phrases together except the big-box themes. Graham is good at drift-netting the stray divagations of thought (the semblance is at best counterfeit), but the writing cannot escape the misery of detours within detours. [...]
These new poems possess the empty urgency and vacant mutterings of a stranger’s deranged cellphone conversation.
https://www.newcriterion.com/issues/2017/6/hither-yon
via thepage

also, Zapruder updates upthread


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Cleanthes
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Dinanukht wannabe
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A little taste of Heißenbüttel:

A 45 year old woman from Birmingham reminds him of something that reminds him of something reminds him of something that reminds him of a girl fields of summer clouds cumulonimbus the classical coastline of the clouds cloud contours cloud sails watermarks on the empty noon sky cloud towers of the horizon thunderclouds shadow hands the white clouds of night cloud-white cloud topography on the very first impact peculiar contradictions become evident blue forest noon heat of June peat smell sweltering heat in the shade sweat drops tar spots under the noon sunshine on the very first impact peculiar contradictions become evident crane cabs rubble overgrown with creepers in the midst of it bevies of swans gaggles of seagulls the drifting of summer clouds useless conversations capsules rattling against the other freely moving

wind the whip of the freely moving stroke the paper pressed against the fence symbols of the world of the dead summer rhythms the sudden thunderstorms the lamp patterns of the nights peat smell in July moorland...
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sub-pet
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^i really like that, thanks. your translation, i presume? since i can't find anything else in english...
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Cleanthes
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I'm glad you liked it. I wish it was my translation, it's the great Michael Hamburger's (translator of Celan, among others), who considered Heissenbüttel the most important German poet of the second half of the 20th. Century. My only contributions to that text were changing "squadrons" to "bevies' (to get closer to the German meaning) and changing "90 degrees in the shade" to "sweltering heat" (diverging from the German original).

Perhaps I should create a thread for Heißenbüttel because he had a fascinating theoretical mind, very close to Borges' but more clearly articulated. Like Borges merged essay, poetry and tale into one continuum, Heissenbuttel did the same (and even added drama into the mix) while explaining it this way: "the development of the arts in the twentieth century shows this characteristic, among others, that it advances sporadically into areas where every genre comes up against the frontiers of every other".

He was also convinced that by the use of "post-subjective progressive literary methods" anyone could create poetry as great as his, or Heine's, or Pound's, indeed, the "question of poetic quality will lose its validity", "artistic accomplishment will no longer depend on the particular talents of any individual but on a methodic approach to language (or other media) that can be taken by anyone". He took upon himself the enormous task of discovering those methods that would allow anyone to "decipher language, reproduce language and generate language-worlds" and, concomitantly, to demonstrate the application of those methods in his poems.
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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me too, Cleanthes (I read this in the early hours when too tired to post) Hamburger''s critical instincts are always to be trusted. Thanks for this, yes do create a thread
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sub-pet
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ah, i see there is in fact a whole book, selected and translated, which curiously even seems to be available for purchase
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nnyhav
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itinerant kibitzer
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https://www.commonwealmagazine.org/celebration-world new crit-bio of Richard Wilbur
via aldaily
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k2doggo
to feel
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johnnywalkitoff
Feb 2 2017, 04:00 PM
I used to mostly think the best Creeley was when he was younger, like the stuff found in collected 1945-1975//// weirder, druggier, funny, and always the best line-breaker I can think of...I went through a stage of my life where I just liked to smoke weed and marvel at the shapes of his poems in air, the way they cut silence up; I only held him up for that reason for a long time...didn't go into his poems for any nourishment, more like "how did he do that...?" but lately I been reading the later collected 1975-2005 and the first book in there I always thought was weak, it's Hello: a Journal and he's traveling around in New Zealand, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, etc...and it seemed good, merely for his music and as an exercise with an I we 'know' to be the poet, Robert Creeley (we can argue literary theory later)... but suddenly things stick out at me like it's mostly about himself (even when he tries to makes it about the world; he's everywhere...we all are); his joy, his despair, his fear of death, "split mind, hearing voice-/ two worlds, two places." "I feel happy, and sad,/ at the same time. I think of/" (a bunch more, just read the book)...it's a strange part of life it gets at...when you are not yet old but no longer young and any pain could be the beginning (end) of being unable to do THIS again or catching yourself in the mirror, softer than you remembered, and being bummed but then also being ecstatic! That you get to do this! But no women look at you anymore and you're just one of the throng...but still O!, there's a different joy in that...what's better? It doesn't matter... There are many poets that you enjoy, and you will leave them alone to do their work...and then there are a few like Creeley, that you miss even though they're dead and you never met them...but i sort of did and am, he left himself there...for us. How courageous that is! Leaving yourself somewhere in song...
using the search function here to find any talking about thomas paine, i entered "paine" in the little portal and it gave me 20pp of results for the word "pain," i don't know why

and i realized that's a great way to read random posts that tend to the emotional, and when i saw this from johnny i had to say, hello johnny, this is great and beautiful and so are you

and speaking of black mountain, how strange i felt when i read a bit of biography of robert duncan lately, and found that he...lived in my home town...went to my junior high school...went to my high school...was my equal at least in misery at the experience...and fled where i fled, to the bay area, tho he landed in oakland instead of berkeley. i was prepared to find out that he lived in my little studio on telegraph avenue, and shopped at the same bookstores
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nnyhav
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https://www.thecut.com/2017/10/profile-rupi-kaur-author-of-milk-and-honey.html poetry bestseller
Quote:
 
... Milk and Honey, the 25-year-old Punjabi-Canadian’s first collection of poetry, is the best-selling adult book in the U.S. so far this year. According to BookScan totals taken near the end of September, the nearly 700,000 copies Kaur has sold put her ahead of runners-up like John Grisham, J.D. Vance, and Margaret Atwood by a margin of more than 100,000. (In 2016, Milk and Honey beat out the next-best-selling work of poetry — The Odyssey­ — by a factor of ten.)


add: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet/2017/10/on-rupi-kaur
Edited by nnyhav, Oct 26 2017, 08:56 PM.
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nnyhav
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itinerant kibitzer
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https://thewalrus.ca/what-happens-when-authors-are-afraid-to-stand-alone/
via thepage
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nnyhav
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nnyhav
Sep 15 2016, 02:04 PM
[snip] ... more pertinent is the subgenre thang (sub to what I call academic poetry) and how it lines up with NYer story MFAing and such ... [snip].

for racial bifurcation see on Lerner and Rankine: https://thepointmag.com/2016/politics/class-dismissed
and now
http://lithub.com/beyond-lyric-shame-ben-lerner-on-claudia-rankine-and-maggie-nelson/
from
http://www.nupress.northwestern.edu/content/fate-difficulty-poetry-our-time-1
Quote:
 
The difficulties found are seldom ever the difficulties looked for, as the editing of this collection has proven. In focusing on the idea of difficulty in contemporary poetry, we at first expected to engage with poems that ennoble modes of complexity, density, indeterminacy, opacity, and abstraction. Such an expectation has, after all, been common in recent critical engagements with self-consciously “innovative” poetry. Yet this way of proceeding sets one up to find precisely what one expects to see, namely the present manifestation of established lineages defined by well-known difficult poets of the past.

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nnyhav
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nnyhav
Jul 7 2015, 09:08 PM
https://twitter.com/jennyharicot/status/935993197364379650
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nnyhav
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https://theoutline.com/post/2488/collin-andrew-yost-the-most-hated-poet-in-portland
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Kat
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nnyhav
Dec 3 2017, 12:21 PM
but no plagiarism at least

makes a person rethink that publishing less than first rate stuff thing, and thinking out loud

And the whole net thing

Edited by Kat, Dec 3 2017, 01:52 PM.
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nnyhav
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soulfies
https://thebaffler.com/latest/instapoetry-roberts
via lithub

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Bloß ein Língshān
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Reading the collected poetry of Miłosz. Started with Three Winters and flipped to the back to This.
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