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Vocabulary Words; get a list going
Topic Started: Jan 26 2007, 03:06 PM (11,167 Views)
WilliamTwellman
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skull-walker
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I would be much obliged if people would post some of the bigger words in their vocabulary accompanied with a short defintion and optionally a ilte phrase showing how the word can be used. These can be taken from lierature or just from the top of your head. I think I am becoming a very good writer, but one thing I'm certain of is I have a relatively weak vocabulary. I'm looking to change that. One book I'd recommend to everyone is Word Power Made Easy. Reading through the book and taking the tests only takes a little time and it gets you going on finding words. I also usually find the vocab in the NYRB and I'm trying to look up words in novels that I don't know although I must admit, I find the practice taxing and it breaks my concentration/motivation to read. Here are a handful from Chabon's article on The Road:

- appurtenance : noun 1. something subordinate to another, more important thing; adjunct; accessory. 2. Law. a right, privilege, or improvement belonging to and passing with a principal property.
ex. If the destruction is sufficiently great, life and its appurtenances are reduced to a kind of bleak perfection...

- pasquinade : noun 1. a satire or lampoon, esp. one posted in a public place.
ex. it can be read at least in part as a bloody pasquinade on the heroic literature of westward expansion.

- syllogism : –noun 1. Logic. an argument the conclusion of which is supported by two premises, of which one (major premise) contains the term (major term) that is the predicate of the conclusion, and the other (minor premise) contains the term (minor term) that is the subject of the conclusion; common to both premises is a term (middle term) that is excluded from the conclusion. A typical form is “All A is C; all B is A; therefore all B is C.”
ex. This paradox, like a brutal syllogism, leads McCarthy...to conlcude the Road on a note of possible redemption.

let's get it going!
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suzannahhh
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Forum junkie
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I'll put up words I especially love
and I warn you
hard to find any I don't
really love

(though I am not fond of
"nice"
and "lady" leaves
ashes in my mouth___)


interstitial -
I think of
betweens and margins
the lattice of spiderwork
my connective tissue

the places of part one thing/part another
where most everything fascinating happens

and it dances so subtle sexy on the lips
as you say it
requires the tongue to be
in several places
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Mudfrost
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Literary lunatic
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Alright, you know this word but:

periphery


Splendid sounding, don't you think?
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suzannahhh
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O yessss definitely lovely
and also marginal zonish
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Pointsman
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A pessimist is never disappointed
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Antidisestablishmentarianism


The most banal, pointless, derivative word ever invented... I love it!
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Mudfrost
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somnambulism for both sound and definition. Still most likely a word you know.

Sorry, I'm not following the rules very well. I'll bow out.
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suzannahhh
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mitching

skulking or lurking
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golganooza
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recalcitrant

This is one of my favourites in my language, though I'm not quite sure how it sounds to English ears...

The Oxford Concise says: obstinately disobidient, objecting to restraint
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suzannahhh
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and, golganooza,
pairs very well
with one of my favorites

incorrigible

similarly disobedient disruptive
unrepentant
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kline19
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worker bee
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i am hung up over disembodied these days...
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onefatman
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Parallax (reading too much Zizek lately):
(Greek: παραλλαγή (parallagé) = alteration) is the change of angular position of two stationary points relative to each other as seen by an observer, due to the motion of said observer. Or more simply put, it is the apparent shift of an object against a background due to a change in observer position.
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suzannahhh
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widdershins

counter-clockwise
towrad the sinister side

I LOVE THIS WORD
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Mateo
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WilliamTwellman
Jan 26 2007, 03:06 PM
- syllogism :  –noun  1. Logic. an argument the conclusion of which is supported by two premises, of which one (major premise) contains the term (major term) that is the predicate of the conclusion, and the other (minor premise) contains the term (minor term) that is the subject of the conclusion; common to both premises is a term (middle term) that is excluded from the conclusion. A typical form is “All A is C; all B is A; therefore all B is C.”
ex. This paradox, like a brutal syllogism, leads McCarthy...to conlcude the Road on a note of possible redemption.

A far more instructive syllogism:

"A syllogism: other men die;
But I am not another;
Therefore I will not die."

or something along those lines. From Pale Fire.
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suzannahhh
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quiddity

1. The real nature or essence of a thing; that which makes a thing what it is.

1569 J. SANDFORD tr. Agrippa's Van. Artes 21 The true demonstration..is that whiche is made (as the Logitioners speake) by Quiddites, and by the proper difference of thinges. 1628 T. SPENCER Logick 75 Dissent is in the qualitie not the quidditie, or being of the subject. 1670 MAYNWARING Vita Sana x. 106 These notions being too..remote from the quiddity, essence and spring of the Disease. 1710 BERKELEY Princ. Hum. Knowl. §81 The positive abstract idea of quiddity, entity, or existence. 1828 DE QUINCEY Rhetoric Wks. 1862 X. 76 The quiddity, or characteristic difference, of poetry as distinguished from prose. 1897 S. S. SPRIGGE Life of T. Wakley xiii. 125 The quiddity of each attitude was the desire to curtail the privileges of the hospital surgeons.

b. Something intangible. rare1.

1774 BURKE Sp. Amer. Tax. Wks. 1842 I. 158 Fighting for a phantom; a quiddity; a thing that wants, not only a substance, but even a name.

2. A subtlety or captious nicety in argument; a quirk, quibble. (Alluding to scholastic arguments on the ‘quiddity’ of things.)

1539 TAVERNER Gard. Wysed. I. 18b, [He] must nat playe with hys sophemes and quyddities. 1579 FULKE Heskins' Parl. 475 Hee saith hee will not vse the quiddities of the schooles, but plaine examples. 1678 R. BARCLAY Apol. Quakers §12. 371 To find out and invent subtile Distinctions and Quiddities. 1731 Plain Reas. for Presbyt. Dissent. 138 The most honest cause is often run down with the torrent and speat of law-quirks and quiddities. 1807 W. IRVING Salmag. (1824) 33, I humbly solicit..A quiddity, quirk, or remonstrance to send. 1877 C. GEIKIE Christ xxv. (1879) 281 Their..quiddities and quillets, and casuistical cases.
Comb. 1863 DE MORGAN Pref. in From Matter to Spirit 40, I went back to the old quiddity-mongers.

b. Subtlety (of wit); ability or tendency to employ quiddities.

1600 W. WATSON Decacordon (1602) 140 How shall euer those come in heauen, that haue neither qualitie of body to get it..nor quidditie of wit to keepe it? 1881 W. S. GILBERT Patience, To stuff his conversation full of quibble and of quiddity. 1884 R. BUCHANNAN in Pall Mall G. 16 Apr., With the intellectual strength and bodily height of an Anak, he possessed the quiddity and animal spirits of Tom Thumb.


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WilliamTwellman
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skull-walker
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These are great guys!
(and girl)
Let's keep it up! I'll post another handful sometime thise week.
Include textual examples if you can (or make up your own sentence)
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kline19
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worker bee
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i remember there were alot of crazy words in Catch-22 that joseph heller used but he used it in a way that it worked and didnt come off as pretentious.

i just got to know a new word - cognoscenti - which is synonymous to connoisseur.
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ireneadler
Literary lunatic
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oh, I LOVE widdershins and quiddity!!
I can only think of words you surely know; random words I like mostly because of how they sound:
gadget
incentive
flammable
topsy-turvy


(I'll come up with some more later :-)
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WilliamTwellman
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skull-walker
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Keep throwing me some big ones, and there's a chance that I might use them in a special appendix for my new novel.
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suzannahhh
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William ___
you might want to think about
burking your sesquipedalian tendencies
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Docpacey
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Achiever
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Chork -- n., the sound one makes whilst walking in wet shoes.

Agelast -- n., one who does not laugh.
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