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What have you just FINISHED?; Sure you can start em....
Topic Started: Oct 28 2007, 05:28 PM (252,161 Views)
nnyhav
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Jim Tilley, In Confidence [Red Hen]: debut collection from one I'd worked with, now billed as the poet of Wall Street (prior to which he did a Harvard Physics PhD and actuarial stuff, so this is like his fourth career), second book (Cruising from Sixty to Seventy: Poems and Essays) coming next month. Got to reconnect in person Friday night when he gave a reading @ KGB Bar (along with Frannie Lindsay & Nick Flynn) and hear some of the new stuff including title track. As M. Dupin would say, he's both a poet and a mathematician, the latter reflected in but not dominating the former, what I like to call warmly analytic. In the first collection, finding a voice, sometimes doubled, parallax views spanning between poems ... When I questioned the one from it that he decided to read, suggesting another, he introduced me to the friend that this other ("Empty Casings") was about.
Lorrie Moore, Bark [Knopf]: (authread)
Carl Phillips, Quiver of Arrows: Selected Poems 1986-2006 [FSG]: (authread)
and then on to the writerly (and the place of such in culture):
Gerald Murnane, The Plains [New Issues/WMU]: all I can add to authread is me too (well not all but I'm lazy).
B.S. Johnson, Albert Angelo [NDP]: MAO preferred Christie Malrey's Own Double-Entry which disappointed, but I'm in agreement with him on this'un.
Toomas Vint, An Unending Landscape (Eric Dickens) [Dalkey]: a nice conceit, 3 versions or variations around writing one story, from po-mo to mo to pre-mo, but I found execution to be wanting as it progressed or rather regressed, the last one derivative of Chekhov's "Lady with Lapdog" (if you're going to do that you gotta get yer game up to that level), so kinda like passed through the Austerizer.
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nnyhav
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Didi
Mar 23 2014, 08:12 PM
nnyhav
Mar 23 2014, 07:15 PM
he's both a poet and a mathematician, the latter reflected in but not dominating the former, what I like to call warmly analytic.
would like to see him try Oulipian writing
well, he's no Roubaud ...
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nnyhav
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J.J. Perec
Mar 24 2014, 09:38 AM
nnyhav
Mar 23 2014, 09:30 PM
Didi
Mar 23 2014, 08:12 PM
nnyhav
Mar 23 2014, 07:15 PM
he's both a poet and a mathematician, the latter reflected in but not dominating the former, what I like to call warmly analytic.
would like to see him try Oulipian writing
well, he's no Roubaud ...
It would be odd if he's not already aware of them, no?
It's a different project. Oulipo borrows from maths to impose constraints on form (and then to pursue the functional ramificaitons), and takes chance out of the equation (partly in reaction to Surrealism). Tilley uses maths (and physics) more as a repository of analogy, a prism to differentiate sensibility, itself constrained, and accords chance its due (as any actuary might, eg "Serendipity in the Cosmos"), but the focus is more on the human condition (which maths contribute to but don't determine).(not that there's no overlap, but)

cf http://charlescote.blogspot.com/2011/03/in-confidence-interview-with-poet-jim.html
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Myrddin
Mar 26 2014, 08:46 PM
The New York Trilogy, I like the ideas but found the prose dull and unengaging. I found the third part to be weakest and didn't care about characters at all. I couldn't help but feel I had read most of the ideas before, this may be because I've read stories and for that matter seen films influenced by Auster but this did mar my enjoyment. I won't be reading anything else by him.
welcome to the club :)
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nnyhav
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Timothy Donnelly, The Cloud Corporation [wave]: one apparent heir to Ashbery, demonstrates, among other things, an art of modification of commodification, the repackaging of myth and of prior art, a dialogue between form and function, an argument about what the culture has become.
Kingsley Amis, Take a Girl Like You [Penguin]: A tease and a bastard: the book, that is. Well, and the author. Oh yeah, the main characters too. And everybody. But unlike what else I've read of his, the denouement outdoes the ride.
Gilbert Sorrentino, The Abyss of Human Illusion [Coffee House]: the art of disenchantment, of demi-mendacity, late vintage Sorrentino, valedictory and maledictory.
Wilma Stockenström, The Expedition to the Baobob Tree (J.M Coetzee) [archipelago]: the latest from my favorite publisher, a tale of loss compounded from which much is to be gained.
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nnyhav
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Susan Howe, The Midnight [NDP]: hybridity applied to genealogy (esp mom) but interleaving much else including prior work; now I have to get My Emily Dickinson (cf http://jacket2.org/reviews/light)
then a trio on the writer's place in culture:
Luis Chitarroni, The No Variations: Diary of an Unfinished Novel (Darren Koolman) [Dalkey]: Plagiary pastiche and parody on the headspinning Argentine litscene hall of mirrors
Laurent Seksik, The Last Days (Andre Naffis-Sahely) [Pushkin]: Zweiging Zweig (but not parody or pastiche)
Sergei Dovlatov, Pushkin Hills (Katherine Dovlatov) [Counterpoint]: Leningrad to the End of the Line ... also a teaser for my Pushkin project (long procrastinated: V2 of Nabokov's take on Eugene Onegin, Chas Johnston's take [yes there've been others since ... anybody?], The Little Tragedies ...)
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johnnywalkitoff
Apr 23 2014, 03:53 PM
[...]Bluets, Maggie Nelson...fucking excellent, I am finding I really like these memoir/ episodic/ highly allusive/ constantly quoting/ obsessive essayistic, poetic texts...I also really enjoyed Mary Rueffle's Madness, Rack and Honey. They are both clearly different books but they give you so much to consider in life and their obsessions, it's an opening up, generous, erudite but quietly so...
you need to follow up with
Rodrigo de Souza Leăo, All Dogs are Blue (Zoë Perry and Stefan Tobler) [and other stories] asylumination from the inside
and I need to follow up with Bluets (actually, in progress even as we speak albeit mutely)

also
Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar, The Time Regulation Institute (Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawe) [Penguin] authread
Alberto Savinio, Signor Dido (Richard Pevear) [Counterpoint] newspaper bits, variable but when good very good (confused why they put his brother's artwork [Great Metaphysical Interior] on the cover)
Classical Chinese Poetry: An Anthology (David Hinton) [FSG] but not just an anthology (nor just great translation) but wrapped in the context of the development of the tradition and the aesthetic
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nnyhav
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Maggie Nelson, Bluets [wave]: As good as anticipated even not knowing what to expect. Won't spoil it for you.
Unai Elorriaga, Plants Don't Drink Coffee (Amaia Gabantxo) [archipelago]: For no, of children of all ages.
Jim Tilley, Cruising at Sixty to Seventy: poems & essay [Red Hen]: Follow-up to In Confidence
Gert Jonke, Homage to Czerny: Studies in Virtuoso Technique (Jean M. Snook) [dalkey]: Like Bernhard channeling Roussel. Or something. Really something. Took some getting into, but I did.
Mary Ruefle, Selected Poems [wave]: All I can say is, thanks again, Steven! (well I could say more, but
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Heteronym
May 20 2014, 05:38 PM
Finished Don Quixote today, as part of my endeavour to read all the essential 16th-18th century novels. Reaching its end, it all becomes clear how influential this novel has been to all sorts of different writers: Austen, Fielding, Potocki, Torrente Ballaster, Flaubert...
... Sterne ...
(nudge nudge wink wink)
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nnyhav
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Philippe Jaccottet, And, Nonetheless: Selected Prose and Poetry 1990-2009 (John Taylor) [Chelsea]: essayistic capture of the light and transient color of moments of eternity

(as with roger, forced reading hiatus finally over, thx for wellwishes)
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nnyhav
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Yale/Margellos this year provided the last batch of reading, all worthwhile:

Patrick Modiano, Suspended Sentences (Mark Polizzotti): notes from the margins and erasures of Paris
Pierre Michon, Winter Mythologies and Abbots (Ann Jefferson): mainly medieval historical byways
Can Xue, The Last Lover (Annelise Finegan Wasmoen): gnomic intersubjectivities of dreams and loves oddly related
Witold Gombrowicz, Trans-Atlantyk (Danuta Burchardt): frenzied farce as only Gombrowicz can ... reread, sort of; bills itself as An Alternate Translation, and indeed complements rather than supersedes the prior (perhaps overexuberant) attempt (which thus not BTBA-eligible)
(haven't yet acquired Rodrigo Rey Rosa's Severina [Chris Andrews] from them ...)

Merry Christmas to all the Merry Woodsfolk!
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nnyhav
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Hugo Ball, Flametti or The Dandyism of the Poor (Catherine Schelbert) [Wakefield]: vaudevillians, more proto-Brechtian than Dadaesque, from the initiator of the Cabaret Voltaire
Vladimir Lorchenkov, The Good Life Elsewhere (Ross Ufberg) [New Vessel]: dark light comedy on the Assumption of Italy
Scholastique Mukasonga, Our Lady of the Nile (Melanie Mauthner) [archipelago]: Rwandan lycée as pococosm
Christian Bök, Eunoia [Coach House]: Oulipo tributary, exercising vowels (after Rimbaud, Perec)
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nnyhav
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mo' BTBA fodder:

Juan José Saer, La Grande (Steve Dolph) [Open Letter]: I'm with e_jo, this is shortlist fersure.
http://numerocinqmagazine.com/2014/08/04/the-decomposition-of-continuous-movement-review-of-juan-jose-saers-la-grande-richard-farrell/

Jon Fosse, Melancholy II (Eric Dickens) [Dalkey]: pendant to first, too limited for consideration (not to say not worthwhile) (and exempt from my problem with ScandiLit)
http://www.complete-review.com/reviews/norge/fossej2.htm
http://www.asymptotejournal.com/blog/2014/07/10/in-review-melancholy-ii-by-jon-fosse/

Clemens J. Setz, Indigo (Ross Benjamin) [Norton/Liveright]: a hard case, Austrian pomo, maybe longlist ... a bit kitchen-sink, now I have to get Marcus' The Flame Alphabet
http://www.musicandliterature.org/reviews/2014/11/4/clemens-setzs-indigo ... and elsewhere:
Quote:
 
The idea for the book, Setz explains, came from a pair of radically different images. There was an account he had come across, while doing research, of a chimpanzee residing in a sort of retirement home. The animal had been subjected to scientific experimentation — and his health was ruined. The chimp “had figured out that humans were torturers, pretty much.”
But enter Setz’s fascination with the idea of empathy: When the chimp witnessed a volunteer for whom he cared enter the room wearing headphones, “he saw his only friend in the world come into the room, and he had the same wires coming from his skull” — the same ones the poor chimp had been attached to in the experiments. In a moment, the animal tore off the headphones from the volunteer, believing he had saved the man’s life. Strange, dark, twisted — and very Setz.
(source) (which sounds to me a lot like Nabokov's ape [ape-ocryphal] at Jardin des Plantes painting the bars of its cage)
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e joseph
Jan 15 2015, 05:06 PM
nnyhav (it's Dave, yes?),
Glad you also enjoyed La Grande. How did this measure up against other Saer books you've read?

yep, sorry. a bit slow on the uptake, but it was the best of what little I've read (see authread), felt culminative ... some of the others don't pique my interest so much, but still want to find The Investigation.

What has piqued my interest lately is Marechal's Adam Buenosayres, sounds like it may pique yours too.
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nnyhav
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Muriel Spark, Memento Mori [New Directions]: some say her best, at least on a par with Far Cry, but I still have Miss Jean Brodie & Girl of Slender Means to look forward to, thxdammiit roger
Rodrigo Rey Rosa, Severina (Chris Andrews) [Yale/Margellos]: bibliokleptic novella, BTBA-eligible and at least longlistable [MAO]
Pedro Mairal, The Missing Year of Juan Salvatierra (Nick Caistor) [New Vessel]: another taut novella, son's account of an artist's life-work [MAO]
Mary Ruefle, Madness, Rack, and Honey [wave]: a mixed bag of lectures/essays, sometimes insightful sometimes BS but enough of the former to make it worthwhile [therumpus plus sample, Lectures I Will Never Give]
Sait Faik Abasiyanik, A Useless Man: selected stories (Maureen Freely & Alexander Dawe) [archipelago]: just out in time for BTBA-eligibility; "Turkish Chekhov" not too far off, tho wider-ranging in a shorter space, flâneurism around and about Istanbul, where he's an institution (museum, literary prize) [nomadic]
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besides Booth & Rudenstine on Shakespeare's sonnets ...

José-Flores Tappy, Sheds/Hangars: Collected Poems 1983-2013 (John Taylor) [bitter oleander]: in the same ballpark as Jaccottet (she's the editor of his Oeuvres) but less compelling (overemphasis on silences), gains traction in the later work ... BTBA-Poetry eligible, even shortlistable [fortnitely, UOttowa]
Patrick Modiano, Honeymoon (Barbara Wright) [Godine/Verba Mundi]: thematically familiar now, of a piece with Suspended Sentences (Missing Person up next) [MAO]
René Daumal, Pataphysical Essays (Thomas Vosteen) [Wakefield]: the bridge between Jarry and the Collčge de 'Pataphysique [anobium]
Julien Gracq, A Dark Stranger (Christopher Moncrieff) [Pushkin]: didn't work for me quite as well as what else I've read of his, overatmospheric, overwrought, overwritten (but oddly effective despite) [50W]
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Gottfried Benn, Impromptus: Selected Poems and some Prose (Michael Hofmann) [FSG] (reviews in authread)
Bei Dao, The Rose of Time: New & Selected Poems (ed Eliot Weinberger trans et al) [NDP] [Jonathan Hart]
Andrei Bitov, The Symmetry Teacher (Polly Gannon) [FSG] BTBA shortlist-destined [MAO]
Gabriel Josipovici, Hotel Andromeda [Carcanet] [David Winters]; & from Brian Dillon, TLS: "Hotel Andromeda is in one sense a sustained equivocation about how close a novel may come to a critical essay. The answer is: pretty close, and without deficit in tone or momentum. [The protagonist's] problem, though, is quite the reverse: how to draft a work of art history about a figure [Joseph Cornell] who seems to demand a more imaginative approach."

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Pierre Reverdy (ed Mary Ann Cawes trans et al) [nyrb poets] thx Steven
Marius Hentea, Ta Ta Da Da: The Real Life and Celestial Adventures of Tristan Tzara [MIT] thx Didi very much what you said
Ben Marcus, The Flame Alphabet [Vintage] the antilanguage conceit blurs into the pseudoallegorical in strange ways, a new way of undermining that doesn't quite fail better (but with weird synchronicities, to vocal fry & the generation gap, for one) (and there seems to be some kind of progression going on, not just from Setz's Indigo but from the language angle reaching past the aforementioned and forward to Forte and Federman ...)
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So I mentioned Leopoldo Marechal's Adam Buenosayres and John Williams' Augustus in authreads ... since then,

Carlos Labbé, Navidad & Matanza (Will Vanderhyden) [Open Letter]: shades of Viktor Pelevin but with more weight behind and many disappeared chapters, and you gotta love the front-cover blurb: "Begins to fuck with your head from the very first word" --Toby Litt ... [bookforum]

Robin Robertson, Sailing the Forest: Selected Poems [FSG]: His appearances in LRB got me interested, and this book justifies, tho maybe a tad too technically adept, not a rough edge to be had. (John Banville in The Irish Times: "The poetry event of 2014 was Sailing the Forest: Selected Poems, by Robin Robertson (Picador), which affords a longer view of this supremely gifted artist. Here is passion, savagery and tenderness, all combined and all controlled within a faultless technique.") [scotsman; a dissent, via thepage]
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Drago Jančar, The Tree with No Name (Michael Biggins) [Dalkey]: lost in the archives; BTBA shortlist material [TQC]
Carmen Boullosa, Texas: The Great Theft (Samantha Schnee) [Deep Vellum]: Hobbes on the Rio Grande: the Cantina Wars replayed; won Typographical Translation Award & longlisted for PEN/America, but it disappointed, somewhat, too many characters too schematic, a bit too blatant Saramago-channelling in narrative asides, didn't add up for me, but at least captures much of history's complexity and complicity. [WLT agrees; Mantle more sympathetic]
William Empson, The Structure of Complex Words [Harvard]: The superstructure shorthand for drawing distinctions (as with 7 Types), focus on single words a jumping-off point for larger points. Still digesting ...
Leonid Tsypkin, The Bridge over the Neroch and other works (Jamey Gambrell) [NDP]: Being Jewish in Brezhnev's USSR, bit of a slog [3% gets at the problem; Asymptote; TQC]
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