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a little science?
Topic Started: Nov 7 2007, 06:59 PM (9,818 Views)
suzannahhh
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well written little article about
physics, cosmos-style
here

http://www.economist.com/science/displayst...ory_id=10018587

fascinating!
yes?
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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marmalade modernist
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a bit more science would be welcome, Suz Are there any new works, astronomy and physics, to recommend?
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onefatman
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I am currently reading a great book on physics and mathematics and philosophy, but as far as maths is concerned, it's more a discipline pf philosophy than a so-called natural science, well, I turned it over to my fiancé so technically I am no longer reading it. you've probably read it it's Huw Price's Time's arrow and archimedes point
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suzannahhh
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I just got it
last week, Marcel.

though please
mathematics is NOT a SCIENCE
it's a language
primarily spoken in the sciences
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onefatman
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suzannahhh
Nov 8 2007, 02:22 AM

though please
mathematics is NOT a SCIENCE

yes I said something to that effect
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Docpacey
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this, to me, is a nice science article. Turok is pushing the boundaries of cosmology theory, but doing it with a healthy dose of skepticism. the article even includes a criterium for falsification:
Quote:
 
If the cold spot is merely a random fluctuation in the cosmic microwave background, for example, that could be revealed by examining the polarisation of the microwaves coming from it.

brilliant minds, creating plausible metaphorical explanations for the unknown, and then devising tests, whether possible with present technology or not, to validate or refute their explanations. acceptable.
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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maths isn't a science, Marcel. Beyond that, philosophy matters to me because i begin with what i don't know, not what i do. It was also for me a better route, a better medicine if you will than any therapy, because it answers to my nature, and doesnt commence with dysfunction
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onefatman
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Quote:
 
Beyond that, philosophy matters to me because i begin with what i don't know


Yes isn't that great?

Quote:
 
maths isn't a science, Marcel.


I know, that what I meant when I wrote (maybe misleadingly?)

Quote:
 
as far as maths is concerned, it's more a discipline pf philosophy than a so-called natural science,
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcfour/documentaries...ns-future.shtml


if the changes to the bbc make for changes to bbc four i'll be extraordinarily cross

there was a fabulous series a couple of years back on the history of theories of vision, which i'm familiar with from the works of David Lindberg (whose books are fabulous i willl say) but to have an entire series devoted to their explication, release of meaning was fantastic
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suzannahhh
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laaaa
the wonders of fMRI's!

finding out
where the gods reside
or to be more accurate
where one of them is

I do wonder if an intense experience with
the cosmos
or the goddesses
would light up the same areas . . .

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID...7CC9814533B90D7
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Docpacey
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I did something last night I rarely have the pleasure of doing, I went to a reading/signing. Jonah Lehrer, a ridiculously young Rhode's scholar/neuroscientist has written a book called Proust was a Neuroscientist which posits that many of the advances in neuroscience have been anticipated in the work of the modernists. Authors, poets, painters and even chefs who have studied the human experience and created great art had already 'discovered' by their techniques, many of the details that are just now coming to light in the lab.
Before this gets to sounding too much like a PR blurb I just want to say that he's a tremendously bright guy, delves into many of the topics which we discuss broadly here, and he graciously took a slew of questions that, if I closed my eyes, I could have imagined many of you asking.
http://www.amazon.com/Proust-Was-Neuroscie...95058419&sr=8-1

he also has blog, which i haven't read yet.
http://scienceblogs.com/cortex/2007/11/the...ity_of_wine.php

I haven't read the book yet either, but it quickly jumped up my list.
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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Docpacey
Nov 14 2007, 12:00 PM
I did something last night I rarely have the pleasure of doing, I went to a reading/signing. Jonah Lehrer, a ridiculously young Rhode's scholar/neuroscientist has written a book called Proust was a Neuroscientist which posits that many of the advances in neuroscience have been anticipated in the work of the modernists.

That's fabulous Doc. Thanks!
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suzannahhh
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I've been looking at this book
for some time now
and so far
have managed not to hit
the buy button

eventually though
I will
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Docpacey
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More Science!!!!!!!!
A new TOE -- radical dewd.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtm.../scisurf114.xml
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nnyhav
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rather than further jacking the neurobeckett thread I'll update here:
http://nymag.com/news/features/jonah-lehrer-2012-11/
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nnyhav
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get your war on
http://anthropologyreport.com/marshall-sahlins-national-academy-of-sciences-napoleon-chagnon/
cf savageminds.org or anthropomics.blogspot.com for the pros take
(file under misanthropology)
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nnyhav
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^latest LRB had Sahlins' statement on leaving NAS ($ubonly, sorry)
meanwhile more misanthropology:
http://chronicle.com/article/Prominent-Scholar-Was-Banned/139027/

and David Auerbach on antisociology (and take-the-pistemology):
http://www.waggish.org/2013/is-social-science-a-joke/
(tie-in to above in first footnote)
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A Common Reader
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Spent time recently with a thought provoking book, You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier. The book is an intelligent argument by a real internet pioneer in virtual reality technology for the dangers to be found in online collectivism-like this social network site and others. What he calls 'digital Maoism' or 'cybernetic totalism' which he argues are damaging our real world. I have never read a better written piece on how the web and the applications found on it are changing our dealings for the worse with one another and the way we function in the marketplace. His arguments against the "wisdom of crowds" are persuasive- the "idea that the collective is closer to the truth" is put on its head- he is fearful of the suppression of individual voices as we spend our time on social sites like Facebook. He argues convincingly against the damage being done to intellectual property by the internet. I have a best friend with whom I am always arguing about this very issue. He thinks theft of intellectual property is perfectly okay while I am appalled by it- whether it is illegally downloading music and films or not properly crediting a source. As Mr. Lanier says the internet and its purveyors "treat the fruits of their intellects and imaginations as fragments to be given away without pay to the hive mind." I love his comments re social sites-"comments about TV shows, major movies, commercial music releases, and video games must be responsible for almost as much bit traffic as porn. There is certainly nothing wrong with that, but since the Web is killing the old media, we face a situation in which culture is effectively eating its own seed stock." This book has made me pause and think about my online time. I need to be be more careful about it.
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suzannahhh
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I'm not so certain
it's the Internet that is killing the other media

just for example
where are the journa,lists comparable
to Walter Cronkite, Eric Sevareid, Edward R. Murrow,
et al
?

I don't think the Internet is responsible for the lack
of competent journalists
more likely it's the perpetual 24/7 TV news cycle

I'm not a fan of Facebook
but places like this
and the people I encounter
in online literary discussion groups
like here and before here, Spiral Bound
(and particularly the James Joyce list servers)

have netted me some dear and deep friends for life

many of whom I've met and some I haven't (yet)

any thing -
books, film, TV, the Web, music, art -
is what you make of it
Edited by suzannahhh, May 12 2013, 08:16 AM.
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Jacek
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A Common Reader
May 12 2013, 07:45 AM
I love his comments re social sites-"comments about TV shows, major movies, commercial music releases, and video games must be responsible for almost as much bit traffic as porn. There is certainly nothing wrong with that [...]
Well, I don't know. Considering how utterly devoid of insight most of these comments are, I think there is something wrong with it. And I say this not to be snotty but because for all the manifold things I've read online about Dylan's Slow Train Coming, I suspect it'd be generous to say that I have found 5% of it to be worthwhile! I was talking with a friend some time ago about experiencing a shock when I went from watching Kurosawa's beautiful Rhapsody in August to reading a review of it online. It was a horrible, jarring experience, for reasons I won't go into; but my friend's immediate response was "that's what happened to me when I watched Encounters at the End of the World! I read some online reviews and thought 'could we have possibly watched the same movie?!'".

Excessive amounts of my own online time and "bit traffic" have made me realize that what one person who's had long & careful experience with art of various sorts could tell me about Slow Train (to keep the example going) is very likely to be worth infinitely more than all 100 Amazon reviews. It's in the place all these artworks take up in each individual human heart & mind that the interest lies, and where insight develops. Which you'd think is an obvious point, but it wasn't obvious enough to me... I wonder what Dave would say about this, though, Dave the purveyor of many good links. Perhaps the flaw is in the way I look for these things?

But as Suz notes above in a post made while I was typing, then you stumble on a place like this, which even when focused on books has been more revealing to me in terms of music or film commentary than anywhere else I've found on the web (not to mention the literary side of things, or the friendships gained). So certainly not all's lost!
Edited by Jacek, May 12 2013, 08:20 AM.
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