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More Lists; Oh, the Shame!
Topic Started: May 20 2008, 10:13 AM (10,020 Views)
Didi
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Given Eco’s association with the Italian comic magazine Linus I would expect some or most of the following to be among his favourites:
Asterix
B.C.
Bristow
Calvin & Hobbes
Corto Maltese
Crock
Dick Tracy
Dilbert
Doonesbury
Fearless Fosdick
Get Fuzzy
Girighiz
Krazy Kat
Li'l Abner
Maakies
Maus
Peanuts
Pogo
Robotman
Valentina
The Wizard of Id

I think any definitive list will be in one of the Linus issues, from Ecolinus:

Posted Image


Edited by Didi, Oct 22 2017, 11:48 PM.
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Bloß ein Língshān
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A million likes for your post, Didi! Thanks again. You into comics/manga/graphic novel at all?
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Didi
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Not as much as others here but the interest has increased over the past couple of years solely due to the posts here which I read with great interest given my limited knowledge of the genre. I have been a long time fan of novels in collage, but that is different.

The last manga oriented book I read, which I do not see mentioned in the woods (apart from you mentioning the separate novel), was Rampo’s The Strange Tale of Panorama Island illustrated by Suehiro Maruo which I enjoyed immensely, more than the novel itself.
Edited by Didi, Oct 23 2017, 05:18 PM.
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Bloß ein Língshān
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Ah, we had a little discussion on him a while back! http://w11.zetaboards.com/thefictionalwoods/topic/785711/5/

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nnyhav
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this year's list of lists of this year's best
http://www.largeheartedboy.com/blog/archive/2017/11/online_best_of_75.html (with daily updates)

incl a list of books you won't find on any other list, for that matter won't find anywhere else
http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/3am-books-year/
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Didi
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via MAO

https://www.worldliteraturetoday.org/blog/translation-tuesday/world-literature-todays-75-notable-translations-2017

I would add a few to this list most notably The Disconnected by Oguz Atay (tr. ‎by Sevin Seydi) - not just notable but a very important translation.
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roger
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It's astonishing to me that The Evenings by Gerard Reve is not one of the 75 best translated of 2017. I checked the Amazon date - Jan 31 so it qualifies. I know Steven loved this too and several reviews I found thought it a masterpiece.

.
Edited by roger, Dec 12 2017, 05:15 PM.
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Didi
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yes it should be included given the Amazon date

Pushkin's website states November 2016 and my own order came in October 2016 - but it is a book mostly read in 2017 rather 2016 I would say, hence should be there.
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johnnywalkitoff
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as it gets to the end of the year...I think it might be my favorite book of the year, I just loved it....then also Enard's Compass and a book that I really liked but that I find myself thinking about it a lot was João Gilberto Noll's Atlantic Hotel....I found it such a better book than Quiet Creatures on the Corner (and that one I liked but Atlantic Hotel is something else, I thought)...
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mandm
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(Cross-posted from the Gass thread).

William Gass's ' 50 Literary pillars' list:

1. Plato’s Timaeus
2. Aristotle’s The Nicomachean Ethics
3. Thucydides’ The History of the Peloponnesian War
4. Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan: Or the Matter, Form, and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiastical and Civil
5. Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason
6. Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico Philosophicus
7. Gaston Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space
8. Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Biographia Literaria
9. Paul Valéry’s Eupalinos, ou l’architecte
10. Sir Thomas Malory’s Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur
11. Sir Thomas Browne’s Urne Burial
12. Laurence Sterne’s The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman
13. Virginia Woolf’s Selected Diaries
14. Ford Maddox Ford’s Parade's End (the Tietjens tetralogy)
15. William Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra
16. Ben Johnson’s The Alchemist
17. James Joyce’s Ulysses
18. James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake
19. Flann O’Brien’s At Swim-Two-Birds
20. Beckett’s How It Is
21. Beckett’s Ping
22. José Lezama’s Paradiso
23. Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch
24. Jorge Luis Borges’s Labyrinths
25. Thomas Mann’s The Magic Mountain
26. Franz Kafka’s A Country Doctor and Other Stories
27. Herman Broch’s The Sleepwalkers
28. Italo Svevo’s Confessions of Zeno
29. Italo Svevo’s Zeno's Conscience (in William Weaver’s marvelous recent translation)
30. Gustave Flaubert’s Letters
31. Gustave Flaubert’s Bouvard and Pecuchet
32. Stendhal’s The Red and the Black
33. Colette’s Break of Day
34. John Donne’s Poems and Sermons
35. Friedrich Hölderlin’s Hymns
36. Stéphane Mallarmé’s Un Coup de Dés
37. Ezra Pound’s Personae
38. William Butler Yeat’s The Tower
39. Wallace Steven’s Harmonium
40. Henry James’s The Golden Bowl
41. Henry James’s Notebooks
42. William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury
43. Katherine Anne Porter’s Pale Horse, Pale Rider
44. Gertrude Stein’s Three Lives
45. William Gaddis’s The Recognitions
46. John Hawkes’s The Lime Twig
47. Rainer Maria Rilke’s The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge
48. Rainer Maria Rilke’s Duino Elegies
49. Rainer Maria Rilke’s Sonnets to Orpheus
50. Rainer Maria Rilke’s Letters


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nnyhav
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nnyhav
Dec 5 2017, 01:40 PM
this year's list of lists of this year's best
http://www.largeheartedboy.com/blog/archive/2017/11/online_best_of_75.html (with daily updates)[snip]
with so many lists, no surprise that collation would tempt, so no reason not to start a list of such:
https://quartzy.qz.com/1143800/the-best-books-of-2017-if-you-combine-21-best-books-of-2017-lists/
http://lithub.com/the-ultimate-best-books-of-2017-list/
also unsurprisingly few of which pique my interest ...

anyway, one of the more interesting lists of writers' recommendations:
https://bombmagazine.org/articles/looking-back-2017-literature/

add
nnyhav
Dec 5 2017, 01:40 PM
incl a list of books you won't find on any other list, for that matter won't find anywhere else
http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/3am-books-year/
http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/3am-books-year-2/
Edited by nnyhav, Dec 22 2017, 12:03 PM.
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johnnywalkitoff
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making bets on kentucky derby day
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Waggish's list (man this guy has more favorites than I probably read this year)
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nnyhav
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https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

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mandm
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nnyhav
Apr 15 2018, 06:02 PM
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

Raising the issue of the feasability of exhaustiveness in reading and even if we assume for the sake of argument that the writer of that comment has read enough to decide, why doesn't (s)he stop, if nothing is 'great'? Surely there are better things to be doing in that case? Sounds like a posture to me.
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nnyhav
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mandm
Apr 18 2018, 02:47 AM
nnyhav
Apr 15 2018, 06:02 PM
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

Raising the issue of the feasability of exhaustiveness in reading and even if we assume for the sake of argument that the writer of that comment has read enough to decide, why doesn't (s)he stop, if nothing is 'great'? Surely there are better things to be doing in that case? Sounds like a posture to me.
yeahwell, no one can read everything but one can read enough to get the idea, and I've had enough and so mostly agree with what's quoted, and so spend my time on more fertile fields abroad.

but aside from that (and the ruminations on such lists) it's worth noting that the majority cited (and top-heavy at that, it otherwise takes a Nobel to get into the top 5) are women (which goes unremarked in the ruminations, hmmm) (and for me, Eimear McBride the most well only tempting at the mo).
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mandm
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nnyhav
Apr 18 2018, 09:51 AM
mandm
Apr 18 2018, 02:47 AM
nnyhav
Apr 15 2018, 06:02 PM
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

Raising the issue of the feasability of exhaustiveness in reading and even if we assume for the sake of argument that the writer of that comment has read enough to decide, why doesn't (s)he stop, if nothing is 'great'? Surely there are better things to be doing in that case? Sounds like a posture to me.
yeahwell, no one can read everything but one can read enough to get the idea, and I've had enough and so mostly agree with what's quoted, and so spend my time on more fertile fields abroad.

but aside from that (and the ruminations on such lists) it's worth noting that the majority cited (and top-heavy at that, it otherwise takes a Nobel to get into the top 5) are women (which goes unremarked in the ruminations, hmmm) (and for me, Eimear McBride the most well only tempting at the mo).
OK, fair enough. On that note, thanks for feeding the various Balkans/African/etc. literature threads with so much good stuff. McBride's first I thought great, the second yet to be ordered, and after reading Nicola Barker, I'll almost certainly go back to her.
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mandm
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mandm
Apr 18 2018, 01:59 PM
nnyhav
Apr 18 2018, 09:51 AM
mandm
Apr 18 2018, 02:47 AM
nnyhav
Apr 15 2018, 06:02 PM
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

Raising the issue of the feasability of exhaustiveness in reading and even if we assume for the sake of argument that the writer of that comment has read enough to decide, why doesn't (s)he stop, if nothing is 'great'? Surely there are better things to be doing in that case? Sounds like a posture to me.
yeahwell, no one can read everything but one can read enough to get the idea, and I've had enough and so mostly agree with what's quoted, and so spend my time on more fertile fields abroad.

but aside from that (and the ruminations on such lists) it's worth noting that the majority cited (and top-heavy at that, it otherwise takes a Nobel to get into the top 5) are women (which goes unremarked in the ruminations, hmmm) (and for me, Eimear McBride the most well only tempting at the mo).
OK, fair enough. On that note, thanks for feeding the various Balkans/African/etc. literature threads with so much good stuff. McBride's first I thought great, the second yet to be ordered, and after reading Nicola Barker, I'll almost certainly go back to her.
Oh, and Deborah Levy's Hot Milk is on the shelf.
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Cleanthes
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nnyhav, thanks for the link to that list. It's one of the best of its kind I've read in a while.

I would have preferred instead of one book wonders like Sally Rooney and Claire-Louise Bennett (pace Gwendoline Riley) say, Julian Barnes, A L Kennedy, Kate Atkinson or James Kelman, though.
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Cleanthes
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One Story's top ten short stories list, here.
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Funhouse
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The 100 stories that shaped the world

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In April, BBC Culture polled experts around the world to nominate up to five fictional stories they felt had shaped mindsets or influenced history. We received answers from 108 authors, academics, journalists, critics and translators in 35 countries – their choices took in novels, poems, folk tales and dramas in 33 different languages, including Sumerian, K’iche and Ge’ez.


Here's the list. I've read just over half (51).

1. The Odyssey (Homer, 8th Century BC)
2. Uncle Tom’s Cabin (Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1852)
3. Frankenstein (Mary Shelley, 1818)
4. Nineteen Eighty-Four (George Orwell, 1949)
5. Things Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe, 1958)
6. One Thousand and One Nights (various authors, 8th-18th Centuries)
7. Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes, 1605-1615)
8. Hamlet (William Shakespeare, 1603)
9. One Hundred Years of Solitude (Gabriel García Márquez, 1967)
10. The Iliad (Homer, 8th Century BC)
11. Beloved (Toni Morrison, 1987)
12. The Divine Comedy (Dante Alighieri, 1308-1320)
13. Romeo and Juliet (William Shakespeare, 1597)
14. The Epic of Gilgamesh (author unknown, circa 22nd-10th Centuries BC)
15. Harry Potter Series (JK Rowling, 1997-2007)
16. The Handmaid's Tale (Margaret Atwood, 1985)
17. Ulysses (James Joyce, 1922)
18. Animal Farm (George Orwell, 1945)
19. Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë, 1847)
20. Madame Bovary (Gustave Flaubert, 1856)
21. Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Luo Guanzhong, 1321-1323)
22. Journey to the West (Wu Cheng'en, circa 1592)
23. Crime and Punishment (Fyodor Dostoyevksy, 1866)
24. Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen, 1813)
25. Water Margin (attributed to Shi Nai'an, 1589)
26. War and Peace (Leo Tolstoy, 1865-1867)
27. To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee, 1960)
28. Wide Sargasso Sea (Jean Rhys, 1966)
29. Aesop's Fables (Aesop, circa 620 to 560 BC)
30. Candide (Voltaire, 1759)
31. Medea (Euripides, 431 BC)
32. The Mahabharata (attributed to Vyasa, 4th Century BC)
33. King Lear (William Shakespeare, 1608)
34. The Tale of Genji (Murasaki Shikibu, before 1021)
35. The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1774)
36. The Trial (Franz Kafka, 1925)
37. Remembrance of Things Past (Marcel Proust, 1913-1927)
38. Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë, 1847)
39. Invisible Man (Ralph Ellison, 1952)
40. Moby-Dick (Herman Melville, 1851)
41. Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale Hurston, 1937)
42. To the Lighthouse (Virginia Woolf, 1927)
43. The True Story of Ah Q (Lu Xun, 1921-1922)
44. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Lewis Carroll, 1865)
45. Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy, 1873-1877)
46. Heart of Darkness (Joseph Conrad, 1899)
47. Monkey Grip (Helen Garner, 1977)
48. Mrs Dalloway (Virginia Woolf, 1925)
49. Oedipus the King (Sophocles, 429 BC)
50. The Metamorphosis (Franz Kafka, 1915)
51. The Oresteia (Aeschylus, 5th Century BC)
52. Cinderella (unknown author and date)
53. Howl (Allen Ginsberg, 1956)
54. Les Misérables (Victor Hugo, 1862)
55. Middlemarch (George Eliot, 1871-1872)
56. Pedro Páramo (Juan Rulfo, 1955)
57. The Butterfly Lovers (folk story, various versions)
58. The Canterbury Tales (Geoffrey Chaucer, 1387)
59. The Panchatantra (attributed to Vishnu Sharma, circa 300 BC)
60. The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas (Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, 1881)
61. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (Muriel Spark, 1961)
62. The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists (Robert Tressell, 1914)
63. Song of Lawino (Okot p'Bitek, 1966)
64. The Golden Notebook (Doris Lessing, 1962)
65. Midnight's Children (Salman Rushdie, 1981)
66. Nervous Conditions (Tsitsi Dangarembga, 1988)
67. The Little Prince (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, 1943)
68. The Master and Margarita (Mikhail Bulgakov, 1967)
69. The Ramayana (attributed to Valmiki, 11th Century BC)
70. Antigone (Sophocles, c 441 BC)
71. Dracula (Bram Stoker, 1897)
72. The Left Hand of Darkness (Ursula K Le Guin, 1969)
73. A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens, 1843)
74. América (Raúl Otero Reiche, 1980)
75. Before the Law (Franz Kafka, 1915)
76. Children of Gebelawi (Naguib Mahfouz, 1967)
77. Il Canzoniere (Petrarch, 1374)
78. Kebra Nagast (various authors, 1322)
79. Little Women (Louisa May Alcott, 1868-1869)
80. Metamorphoses (Ovid, 8 AD)
81. Omeros (Derek Walcott, 1990)
82. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, 1962)
83. Orlando (Virginia Woolf, 1928)
84. Rainbow Serpent (Aboriginal Australian story cycle, date unknown)
85. Revolutionary Road (Richard Yates, 1961)
86. Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe, 1719)
87. Song of Myself (Walt Whitman, 1855)
88. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain, 1884)
89. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Mark Twain, 1876)
90. The Aleph (Jorge Luis Borges, 1945)
91. The Eloquent Peasant (ancient Egyptian folk story, circa 2000 BC)
92. The Emperor's New Clothes (Hans Christian Andersen, 1837)
93. The Jungle (Upton Sinclair, 1906)
94. The Khamriyyat (Abu Nuwas, late 8th-early 9th Century)
95. The Radetzky March (Joseph Roth, 1932)
96. The Raven (Edgar Allan Poe, 1845)
97. The Satanic Verses (Salman Rushdie, 1988)
98. The Secret History (Donna Tartt, 1992)
99. The Snowy Day (Ezra Jack Keats, 1962)
100. Toba Tek Singh (Saadat Hasan Manto, 1955)


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