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More Lists; Oh, the Shame!
Topic Started: May 20 2008, 10:13 AM (10,498 Views)
mandm
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12.

But I've read other books by some of the authors....
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mandm
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I score seventeen! Aren't lists great.
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mandm
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Well I have the Meursault I, but haven't got around to it yet. But will do as and when.
Edited by mandm, Mar 22 2016, 03:59 PM.
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mandm
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And although I haven't read Berg, I have read Three by Ann Quinn, and it's excellent.
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mandm
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Lists = stats = nerdy.
Last year I read 57 books, a lot for me.

I have calculated that the average number of years between the date of publication and 2015 for the books I read was 47.87.
Hi: 408 (estimated): Anthony and Cleopatra, Shakespeare.
Lo: 0: Satin Island, Tom McCarthy.
Can anyone beat my sadness quotient?
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mandm
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But how can anyone choose Wise Blood over the stories?
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nnyhav
Dec 2 2016, 01:37 PM
this year the best books lists have been underwhelming ...

meanwhile
http://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/let-down-by-the-lists/
Quote:
 
Yes, another prescriptive pile-up of titles, this time intended to complement that bloke-ish list of last year [in Esquire] [...]
“The Sixty Best Books by Women Every Man Should Read (But Could Always Ignore and Stick to Philip Roth)”
(of which I've read over a dozen of the titles, a score of the authors)
My score sadly only 5 and 13.
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mandm
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Best second novels TLS voting list
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mandm
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(Cross-posted from the Gass thread).

William Gass's ' 50 Literary pillars' list:

1. Plato’s Timaeus
2. Aristotle’s The Nicomachean Ethics
3. Thucydides’ The History of the Peloponnesian War
4. Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan: Or the Matter, Form, and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiastical and Civil
5. Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason
6. Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico Philosophicus
7. Gaston Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space
8. Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Biographia Literaria
9. Paul Valéry’s Eupalinos, ou l’architecte
10. Sir Thomas Malory’s Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur
11. Sir Thomas Browne’s Urne Burial
12. Laurence Sterne’s The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman
13. Virginia Woolf’s Selected Diaries
14. Ford Maddox Ford’s Parade's End (the Tietjens tetralogy)
15. William Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra
16. Ben Johnson’s The Alchemist
17. James Joyce’s Ulysses
18. James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake
19. Flann O’Brien’s At Swim-Two-Birds
20. Beckett’s How It Is
21. Beckett’s Ping
22. José Lezama’s Paradiso
23. Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch
24. Jorge Luis Borges’s Labyrinths
25. Thomas Mann’s The Magic Mountain
26. Franz Kafka’s A Country Doctor and Other Stories
27. Herman Broch’s The Sleepwalkers
28. Italo Svevo’s Confessions of Zeno
29. Italo Svevo’s Zeno's Conscience (in William Weaver’s marvelous recent translation)
30. Gustave Flaubert’s Letters
31. Gustave Flaubert’s Bouvard and Pecuchet
32. Stendhal’s The Red and the Black
33. Colette’s Break of Day
34. John Donne’s Poems and Sermons
35. Friedrich Hölderlin’s Hymns
36. Stéphane Mallarmé’s Un Coup de Dés
37. Ezra Pound’s Personae
38. William Butler Yeat’s The Tower
39. Wallace Steven’s Harmonium
40. Henry James’s The Golden Bowl
41. Henry James’s Notebooks
42. William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury
43. Katherine Anne Porter’s Pale Horse, Pale Rider
44. Gertrude Stein’s Three Lives
45. William Gaddis’s The Recognitions
46. John Hawkes’s The Lime Twig
47. Rainer Maria Rilke’s The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge
48. Rainer Maria Rilke’s Duino Elegies
49. Rainer Maria Rilke’s Sonnets to Orpheus
50. Rainer Maria Rilke’s Letters


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mandm
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nnyhav
Apr 15 2018, 06:02 PM
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

Raising the issue of the feasability of exhaustiveness in reading and even if we assume for the sake of argument that the writer of that comment has read enough to decide, why doesn't (s)he stop, if nothing is 'great'? Surely there are better things to be doing in that case? Sounds like a posture to me.
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mandm
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nnyhav
Apr 18 2018, 09:51 AM
mandm
Apr 18 2018, 02:47 AM
nnyhav
Apr 15 2018, 06:02 PM
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

Raising the issue of the feasability of exhaustiveness in reading and even if we assume for the sake of argument that the writer of that comment has read enough to decide, why doesn't (s)he stop, if nothing is 'great'? Surely there are better things to be doing in that case? Sounds like a posture to me.
yeahwell, no one can read everything but one can read enough to get the idea, and I've had enough and so mostly agree with what's quoted, and so spend my time on more fertile fields abroad.

but aside from that (and the ruminations on such lists) it's worth noting that the majority cited (and top-heavy at that, it otherwise takes a Nobel to get into the top 5) are women (which goes unremarked in the ruminations, hmmm) (and for me, Eimear McBride the most well only tempting at the mo).
OK, fair enough. On that note, thanks for feeding the various Balkans/African/etc. literature threads with so much good stuff. McBride's first I thought great, the second yet to be ordered, and after reading Nicola Barker, I'll almost certainly go back to her.
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mandm
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mandm
Apr 18 2018, 01:59 PM
nnyhav
Apr 18 2018, 09:51 AM
mandm
Apr 18 2018, 02:47 AM
nnyhav
Apr 15 2018, 06:02 PM
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/best-british-and-irish-novelists-today/
round up the usual suspects
Quote:
 
More fascinating are those who actively rejected the invitation. “My heavily biased opinion”, one wrote, “is that there are NO great British novelists writing at the moment.” A full stop, and then: “Nor American”.

Raising the issue of the feasability of exhaustiveness in reading and even if we assume for the sake of argument that the writer of that comment has read enough to decide, why doesn't (s)he stop, if nothing is 'great'? Surely there are better things to be doing in that case? Sounds like a posture to me.
yeahwell, no one can read everything but one can read enough to get the idea, and I've had enough and so mostly agree with what's quoted, and so spend my time on more fertile fields abroad.

but aside from that (and the ruminations on such lists) it's worth noting that the majority cited (and top-heavy at that, it otherwise takes a Nobel to get into the top 5) are women (which goes unremarked in the ruminations, hmmm) (and for me, Eimear McBride the most well only tempting at the mo).
OK, fair enough. On that note, thanks for feeding the various Balkans/African/etc. literature threads with so much good stuff. McBride's first I thought great, the second yet to be ordered, and after reading Nicola Barker, I'll almost certainly go back to her.
Oh, and Deborah Levy's Hot Milk is on the shelf.
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mandm
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44, plus bits and bobs (some Chaucer, some Proust f'rinstance).
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mandm
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Guardian summer reads list by various authors
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