Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to The Fictional Woods. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Nobel Prize 2012; wild speculations
Topic Started: Aug 4 2012, 09:37 AM (15,702 Views)
Deleted User
Deleted User

Canox
Oct 14 2012, 03:50 PM
Oh you know me, there is always some kind of alcohol involved.
yes, I know I can count on you :)
Quote Post Goto Top
 
Deleted User
Deleted User

Canox
Oct 14 2012, 03:33 PM
Heteronym
Oct 14 2012, 02:48 PM
people aren't stupid.
I would suggest the opposite is true and is the reason why there are not more referendums. A good reason, too. I approve.
yes,
http://w11.zetaboards.com/thefictionalwoods/single/?p=8138564&t=785217
Quote Post Goto Top
 
nnyhav
Member Avatar
itinerant kibitzer
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
http://www.theawl.com/2012/10/how-to-win-the-nobel-prize-in-literature
via bookslut
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Paul
Member Avatar
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
Wow, it seems that the Secretary-General of the Council of Europe is also the Chairman of the Nobel Comittee:

Quote:
 
Jagland is in favour of Norwegian membership of the European Union. In 1990, he published the book Min europeiske drøm[11] (My European dream). He has also proposed the European Union be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Nobel Peace Prize was finally awarded to the European Union by Jagland himself in 2012.
(from wikipedia)

That's funny... surprised there wasnt any fake, pointless outrage over this.

It is a very telling sign of our strange times that at least in Europe the only successfull (anti-capitalist) oppostion parties are those of the far right, nationalist populists, neo-fascists, Islam "critics" etc. Everyone criticizing the policies of the European Union has to come to terms with this fact, I think. I also like how biscuits called himself an "old fashioned internationalist" - that's the spirit. (so strangely lacking in so many leftists today)

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
suzannahhh
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Paul
Oct 16 2012, 08:40 AM
Wow, it seems that the Secretary-General of the Council of Europe is also the Chairman of the Nobel Comittee:

Quote:
 
Jagland is in favour of Norwegian membership of the European Union. In 1990, he published the book Min europeiske drøm[11] (My European dream). He has also proposed the European Union be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Nobel Peace Prize was finally awarded to the European Union by Jagland himself in 2012.
(from wikipedia)

That's funny... surprised there wasnt any fake, pointless outrage over this.

It is a very telling sign of our strange times that at least in Europe the only successfull (anti-capitalist) oppostion parties are those of the far right, nationalist populists, neo-fascists, Islam "critics" etc. Everyone criticizing the policies of the European Union has to come to terms with this fact, I think. I also like how biscuits called himself an "old fashioned internationalist" - that's the spirit. (so strangely lacking in so many leftists today)

Paul don't be fooled by the avatar photo
biscuit is a woman!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Funhouse
Member Avatar
Perpetually Lost
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
A Couscous of World Literature : The New Yorker

Quote:
 
The Swedish Academy has once again made an outstanding choice for the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature—congratulations to Mo Yan, who is best known for “Red Sorghum,” a novel published in 1987. Sorghum, you may be interested to know, is the world’s fifth most important cereal crop; like most grains, it can be fermented into a liquor, and Mo tells the story of a girl who works in a distillery. But he is not the first Nobel laureate—or magic realist—whose fiction refers to a carbohydrate. In 1949, Miguel Angel Asturias, of Guatemala, published “Men of Maize.”

This may be a trend, and, if so, Kenya’s Ngugi wa Thiong’o, the author of “A Grain of Wheat,” whose chances of winning a Nobel were 50-1 this year, may have a better shot down the road, especially, perhaps, since as a novelist he has renounced English for his native Gikuyu, a language spoken by about five million people which is thus far without a laureate. (One of their food staples is a cornmeal porridge known as ugali or posho.)

Once you start to research the influence of cereal grains on fiction, you discover that they have nourished many fertile imaginations, including those of Harry Crews (“Blood and Grits”); John Steinbeck (“Tortilla Flat”); Kurt Vonnegut (“Breakfast of Champions”); the contemporary Swiss novelist Aglaja Veteranyi (“Why the Child Is Cooking in the Polenta”), who was tragically short-lived; and, of course, J. D. Salinger. “Catcher in the Rye” may be the most popular dish of the lot.
Online Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Paul
Member Avatar
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
suzannahhh
Oct 16 2012, 09:31 AM
]Paul don't be fooled by the avatar photo
biscuit is a woman!
Oh, sorry, got confused, with the Murphy in the name and all. :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
oneofmurphysbiscuits
Member Avatar
marmalade modernist
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
:P it's from an egregiously precocious - but to me very funny - joke in Beckett's novel "Murphy" Paul. And yes, i'm more than a bit skeptical about all "sides" without being the least bit Euroskeptic.

Thanks as ever to my dearest mate {{{{{{{{{{Suz}}}}}}}}}}
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
« Previous Topic · General discussion · Next Topic »
Add Reply