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Nobel Prize 2013; Let the madness begin!
Topic Started: Jul 19 2013, 12:35 AM (8,616 Views)
DDR
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If Orthofer already started, why can't we?...

Early Nobel Odds
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Bjorn
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90 years in advance? That's a bit early, isn't it? :P

I'm going to throw an odd name out there: Svetlana Alexievich. With Gitta Sereny gone from my favourite "they have to give it to a non-fiction writer at some point" list, she's one of the remaining post-war journalists looking deeply at the nature of oppression and what it does to people in the long run. Plus, for those who think that matters, she's being hyped in Sweden right now with the release of her supposedly final book on the Soviet Union, Second Hand Time (which actually came out in Swedish before it was even available in Russian) as well as several re-releases.

And as long as we're talking about Europeans, what are the chances of Hilary Mantel showing up on any lists?

Vijaydan Detha and Eduardo Mendoza Garriga, huh? Anyone familiar with them? Hanan Al-Shaykh is a new name for me too, I think...
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byrd
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I wanted Pynchon for 2012.

Ctrl+C Ctrl+V

:)
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Myrddin
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Is there a (rough) pattern to which territories get it? I.e.Europe one year, Asia another, Africa enother etc? Not necessarily in order. I was very surprised that Lessing got it so soon after Pinter.
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Elie
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Myrddin
Jul 19 2013, 04:50 AM
Is there a (rough) pattern to which territories get it? I.e.Europe one year, Asia another, Africa enother etc? Not necessarily in order. I was very surprised that Lessing got it so soon after Pinter.
Not that I've ever been able to fathom. I think we must be due an African writer soon, though.
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param
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Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 03:04 AM
Vijaydan Detha and Eduardo Mendoza Garriga, huh? Anyone familiar with them? Hanan Al-Shaykh is a new name for me too, I think...

Vijaydan Detha ( 87yrs) is from India, prominent short story writer in Hindi and Rajasthani. I haven't read any of his books to comment, but he seems to be pretty well known in the Hindi Literature belt.

Apparently, his name was figuring in the 2011 contenders list ( I don't remember, but according to this press report) : http://www.dnaindia.com/lifestyle/1596594/report-vijaydan-detha-the-nobel-contender-from-rajasthan

Here is one for your appetite : http://pratilipi.in/2010/07/the-crafty-thief-vijaydan-detha/
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Bjorn
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Myrddin
Jul 19 2013, 04:50 AM
Is there a (rough) pattern to which territories get it? I.e.Europe one year, Asia another, Africa enother etc? Not necessarily in order. I was very surprised that Lessing got it so soon after Pinter.
The Academy themselves claim that they don't focus on countries or continents, but on individual authorships. (Which historically tends to mean white male Europeans, though at least they've been increasingly aware of this in recent years...)

The last 10 years have gone Africa-Europe-Europe-Europe-Europe/Africa*-Europe/Africa-Europe**-South America-Europe-Asia.
* Lessing, born in Zimbabwe, but hardly an "African" writer
** Le Clézio, dual French/Mauritian citizenship
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Bjorn
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param
Jul 19 2013, 05:16 AM
Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 03:04 AM
Vijaydan Detha and Eduardo Mendoza Garriga, huh? Anyone familiar with them? Hanan Al-Shaykh is a new name for me too, I think...

Vijaydan Detha ( 87yrs) is from India, prominent short story writer in Hindi and Rajasthani. I haven't read any of his books to comment, but he seems to be pretty well known in the Hindi Literature belt.

Apparently, his name was figuring in the 2011 contenders list ( I don't remember, but according to this press report) : http://www.dnaindia.com/lifestyle/1596594/report-vijaydan-detha-the-nobel-contender-from-rajasthan

Here is one for your appetite : http://pratilipi.in/2010/07/the-crafty-thief-vijaydan-detha/
Thanks! I'll check him out.

One Indian name that tends to pop up in Nobel discussions is Mahasweta Devi, what's her status in India? I've read a collection of short stories and thought she was really good, if a bit preachy at times.
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Myrddin
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Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 05:51 AM
Myrddin
Jul 19 2013, 04:50 AM
Is there a (rough) pattern to which territories get it? I.e.Europe one year, Asia another, Africa enother etc? Not necessarily in order. I was very surprised that Lessing got it so soon after Pinter.
The Academy themselves claim that they don't focus on countries or continents, but on individual authorships. (Which historically tends to mean white male Europeans, though at least they've been increasingly aware of this in recent years...)

The last 10 years have gone Africa-Europe-Europe-Europe-Europe/Africa*-Europe/Africa-Europe**-South America-Europe-Asia.
* Lessing, born in Zimbabwe, but hardly an "African" writer
** Le Clézio, dual French/Mauritian citizenship
Do authors have to have been translated into English or another European language? I mean it must be very difficult to judge a book written in an Asian or African language?
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param
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Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 05:52 AM
One Indian name that tends to pop up in Nobel discussions is Mahasweta Devi, what's her status in India? I've read a collection of short stories and thought she was really good, if a bit preachy at times.
If there is one genuine contender from India, to me, it is Mahasweta Devi. Agree, she tends to be a bit preachy at times, as she is very active in social activities, typically supporting those 'under privileged' people.
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suzannahhh
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Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 03:04 AM
90 years in advance? That's a bit early, isn't it? :P

.
I corrected the year
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Elie
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suzannahhh
Jul 19 2013, 07:45 AM
Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 03:04 AM
90 years in advance? That's a bit early, isn't it? :P

.
I corrected the year
Thanks, Suz!
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Elie
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Myrddin
Jul 19 2013, 07:36 AM
Do authors have to have been translated into English or another European language? I mean it must be very difficult to judge a book written in an Asian or African language?
I believe they commission translations where there aren't any existing.
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Bjorn
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Elie
Jul 19 2013, 09:13 AM
Myrddin
Jul 19 2013, 07:36 AM
Do authors have to have been translated into English or another European language? I mean it must be very difficult to judge a book written in an Asian or African language?
I believe they commission translations where there aren't any existing.
That's what happened with Mo Yan, for instance, though several of his books were already available in Swedish. Plus the members of the Academy collectively speak more than a dozen languages, including Chinese. I think there was an intervew with Academy member Per Wästberg about this somewhere, but I can't find it right now.

I'm not sure how often that's been used, though; pretty much every winner of the last 20 years has been easily available in either Swedish, French, or English. Peter Englund comments here that "I wish more members of the Academy had time to translate candidates themselves. It gives you an unbeatable perspective on the author's style, and also a great platform to judge translations into other languages."

So basically, there's no rule that says they have to have been translated into another language. In practice, though, they usually already are.

And thanks, Suz!

EDIT: Here's the Wästberg article, in response to the usual US butthurt.
Quote:
 
We master thirteen languages in the Academy but when we suspect a genius hidden in an unknown language we call on translators and oath-sworn experts to give us generous samples of that writer.

We go for an individual’s life’s work regardless of nation, gender, or religion. We could, if need be, give it to Portugal or the US five times in a row, or to essayists, historians, or children’s book writers.
Edited by Bjorn, Jul 19 2013, 10:11 AM.
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DDR
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Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 03:04 AM
Vijaydan Detha and Eduardo Mendoza Garriga, huh? Anyone familiar with them? Hanan Al-Shaykh is a new name for me too, I think...
My turn with Eduardo Mendoza (don't know why the hell they keep adding the Garriga at betting lists, it never shows at the cover of his books).
He is a Spanish author that mostly writes detective thrillers/novel noir kind of books. He is good at what he does, but he is far away from being a true contender for this prize.

This two lists basically dropped the names from Ladbrokes when the prize was announced last year, so that is why you see so many repeated names. At least they deleted Mo Yan although not Chinua Achebe. Real action will come up when Ladbrokes publishes their list, probably late August.
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Bjorn
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DDR
Jul 19 2013, 01:07 PM
Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 03:04 AM
Vijaydan Detha and Eduardo Mendoza Garriga, huh? Anyone familiar with them? Hanan Al-Shaykh is a new name for me too, I think...
My turn with Eduardo Mendoza (don't know why the hell they keep adding the Garriga at betting lists, it never shows at the cover of his books).
He is a Spanish author that mostly writes detective thrillers/novel noir kind of books. He is good at what he does, but he is far away from being a true contender for this prize.
Ah, OK. So he's on the lists for the same reason GW Persson is, then.

Quote:
 
This two lists basically dropped the names from Ladbrokes when the prize was announced last year, so that is why you see so many repeated names. At least they deleted Mo Yan although not Chinua Achebe. Real action will come up when Ladbrokes publishes their list, probably late August.

And they still haven't managed to spell "Ian McEwan" correctly either.
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Heteronym
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Elie
Jul 19 2013, 09:13 AM
Myrddin
Jul 19 2013, 07:36 AM
Do authors have to have been translated into English or another European language? I mean it must be very difficult to judge a book written in an Asian or African language?
I believe they commission translations where there aren't any existing.
According to José Saramago, in his blog, after Blindness the Academy was all set to give him the Nobel Prize. But in the meantime his new novel, All The Names, had come out, and there was no Swedish translation yet. Wary of giving Saramago the Nobel if this new novel were crap, they had to check it out before making a decision. So one of their members got a Portuguese copy, a dictionary and spent all Summer reading the novel. And the rest is history. The member who read it told him this story during the ceremony :)
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nnyhav
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Reference point for new joiners: The usual suspects from last year's speculations (the quoted unattributed carryover from the year before thanks to alliknowis)

My guess is that they stay outside the EU and the Anglosphere again this year:
Ismail Kadare, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Amos Oz, Assia Djebar (I'd put Adonis in the mix except for Syria ...)
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Elie
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nnyhav
Jul 19 2013, 04:50 PM
My guess is that they stay outside the EU and the Anglosphere again this year:
Ismail Kadare, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Amos Oz, Assia Djebar (I'd put Adonis in the mix except for Syria ...)
Not read Oz, but I think the other 3 are all very deserving.
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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i've reservations as to Doris' writing, but they're part and parcel of, and for me Pinter and Lessing were the only two hereabouts who deserved it, and Doris is getting on a bit. Prizes arent my thing, but I was so glad that Tomas Transtromer won in 2011
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