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Nobel Prize 2013; Let the madness begin!
Topic Started: Jul 19 2013, 12:35 AM (8,622 Views)
Elie
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Literary lunatic
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param
Jul 19 2013, 07:40 AM
Bjorn
Jul 19 2013, 05:52 AM
One Indian name that tends to pop up in Nobel discussions is Mahasweta Devi, what's her status in India? I've read a collection of short stories and thought she was really good, if a bit preachy at times.
If there is one genuine contender from India, to me, it is Mahasweta Devi. Agree, she tends to be a bit preachy at times, as she is very active in social activities, typically supporting those 'under privileged' people.
Where would you recommend starting with her? I've never really heard of her but sounds interesting. Most of the stuff on Amazon is pretty expensive, though.
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Thomas Hounds
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Can't believe it's already time to start speculating again. These prizes have started to come and go and come by so fast...it's getting unnerving how fast years are coming and going. Seems like just yesterday Mo Yan won it.

I'm pretty consistent in my belief that a less well-known American figure should win it, like Edward Albee or even god-forbid John Ashberry.
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Funhouse
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The estimable M. Orthofer gave us another mention so we should keep this humming along.

I'd like to remind people of some of the Australian candidates, who tend to fly under the radar a bit, in the shadow of the Americans.

The ones who come up on the Ladbrokes list each year are Peter Carey, David Malouf, Les Murray and Gerald Murnane, and they probably are the ones I'd pick as the main candidates. Maybe you could throw Tim Winton in there, although I don't rate him as highly. That's all men, of course. Shirley Hazzard, perhaps? Although has she written enough?

From New Zealand you'd probably be looking at Witi Ihimaera and Patricia Grace. Choosing a Maori writer might appeal, but Ihimaera has probably ruled himself out following the plagiarism scandal of a few years ago, and I don't think Grace is in quite the same league as the Australians.

Sticking with Anglo-Commonwealth countries, I would be happy with either Alice Munro or Michael Ondaatje, who are both probably pretty strong contenders.

Who would I personally like out of those mentioned? Murnane.
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kline19
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Ondaatje's Nobel lecture would be something I'd like to read if he were to be given the Nobel...
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DDR
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Funhouse
Aug 13 2013, 06:18 AM
Sticking with Anglo-Commonwealth countries, I would be happy with either Alice Munro or Michael Ondaatje, who are both probably pretty strong contenders.
What about Rohinton Mistry? Being Canadian/Indian the Academy would be killing two birds with one stone if he wins.
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Funhouse
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DDR
Aug 13 2013, 06:11 PM
Funhouse
Aug 13 2013, 06:18 AM
Sticking with Anglo-Commonwealth countries, I would be happy with either Alice Munro or Michael Ondaatje, who are both probably pretty strong contenders.
What about Rohinton Mistry? Being Canadian/Indian the Academy would be killing two birds with one stone if he wins.
Same for Ondaatje with Canada/Sri Lanka, I suppose. Yes, Mistry would be good as well. I've really liked what I've read of his, and he does have form with his recent Neustadt win, that award having some correlation with Nobels.
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Cleanthes
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Time to put my cards on the table. This is my 'damn right, they deserve to win' baker's dozen list of writers:

Poets: Philippe Jaccottet, Yves Bonnefoy, Adelia Prado, Ana Blandiana, Nicanor Parra, Les Murray.
Novelists: Paul Nizon, Cynthia Ozick, Robert Coover, Milan Kundera, Amin Maalouf, Pascal Quignard, Lobo Antunes.

I'm sad that I had to replace the great Slawomir Mrozek on my list.
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DDR
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Interesting list Cleanthes

Liked your selection so I will post my twelve favorites as well:

Poetry: José Emilio Pacheco, Juan Gelman, Nicanor Parra, Adonis.
Prose: Ismail Kadare, Haruki Murakami, Amin Maalouf, Juan Goytisolo, Amos Oz, Cormac McCarthy, Salman Rushdie, Ngugi wa Thiog'o

By the way, shouldn't take long for Ladbrokes to publish their list; last year it was out on August 23, so we might have it ready this week.
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rouquette
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World Literature Today (http://www.worldliteraturetoday.org/why-ismail-kadare-should-win-2013-nobel-prize-literature) and I both think Ismail Kadare should win. I have read twenty-one of his books and still have several more in my library to read. With Tranströmer two years ago, I am not sure that they will go for another poet.
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DDR
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rouquette
Aug 28 2013, 04:38 PM
World Literature Today (http://www.worldliteraturetoday.org/why-ismail-kadare-should-win-2013-nobel-prize-literature) and I both think Ismail Kadare should win. I have read twenty-one of his books and still have several more in my library to read. With Tranströmer two years ago, I am not sure that they will go for another poet.
Completely agree, one of my favorites as well
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nnyhav
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mine too (and welcome aboard rouquette), in fact at one point I thought he'd already won (but as in wrong one)...
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Thomas Hounds
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Haven't read anything by Mistry. What type of writer is he, generally?

My picks would probably be:

Poets the only real options for me are: Adonis, Ko Un, and Tanikawa Shuntarō . Shuntarō is probably the one most people are least familiar with, but he has an almost 6 decade career as a poet in Japan, and has consistently been one of the nation's most popular and translated poet for many years, not to mention a translator himself. Here's an example of one Tanikawa's striking and intense poems, from a later collection:

Quote:
 
Road

It’s a tangled road
a snarl of yarn that can’t be unraveled
there is one exit, being a maze,
the blue sky alone, opening above.

I have been chasing you
hoping to glimpse the far-off place
you gaze at, to see past your back,
around corners of dawn, past noons in the park.

Along rivers of evenings, overpasses of darkness
a map of days was followed,
yet coming to an open view of the mountains
I lost sight of your receding form.


Playwrights: Edward Albee

Novelists/fiction writers: Amos Oz, Ngugi wa-Thiogo, and Peter Carey are the only ones that come up that I'm remotely qualified to judge and don't find particularly offensive. Murakami could fall into that category too, but I can't get over myself and my opinion of him as both overrated because of his western chic-ish-ness (his profile in Japan is nowhere near as enormous and respected as you would think given his ubiquitous presence as the singular example of Japanese literature on most American bookshelves), and that I want him to have to wait a while longer before winning. It would be a shame, if he won rather than someone like Tanikawa Shuntaro.
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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A Fine Balance is a brilliant, Jake. I'm not going to say much about it at some distance from, tbut by all means recommended. Will bookmark Shuntaro
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rouquette
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I would agree with oneofmurphysbiscuits that A Fine Balance is wonderful work and if Kadare does not win, Mistry would be a good candidate. Is it India/Canada's turn?
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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Seamus Heaney died today. If you've still to read his poetry, please read his poetry.

And thankyou for nudging me to read Ismail Kadare, {{{{{{{{Dave}}}}}}}}}}} and rouquette
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Elie
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I loved A Fine Balance. Any recommendation on what to read next? I've not heard nearly as much acclaim for any of his other novels.
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Funhouse
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Elie
Aug 30 2013, 04:23 PM
I loved A Fine Balance. Any recommendation on what to read next? I've not heard nearly as much acclaim for any of his other novels.
I've read Such a Long Journey and Tales From Firozsha Baag, both of which are excellent. Either of those would be a good next step. Both are earlier than A Fine Balance.
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Bjorn
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From Orthofer on twitter: Ladbrokes odds up. Phew. Finally something substantial for journalists to base their speculations on.

The list is pretty much same ol' same ol', though I'm impressed that Chang-rae Lee is apparently important enough to be listed twice.
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Elie
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Bjorn
Sep 3 2013, 08:58 AM
From Orthofer on twitter: Ladbrokes odds up. Phew. Finally something substantial for journalists to base their speculations on.

The list is pretty much same ol' same ol', though I'm impressed that Chang-rae Lee is apparently important enough to be listed twice.
Don't remember Joyce Carol Oates being anything like that high last year, unless my memory's going? That's the most interesting thing in there for me.
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John Gargo
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Where's E.L. James?! :eek:
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