Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to The Fictional Woods. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Nobel Prize 2013; Let the madness begin!
Topic Started: Jul 19 2013, 12:35 AM (8,398 Views)
suzannahhh
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
not being a short story lover
I haven't read anytihng of hers either
but
I ordered up her latest book
immediately

and of course I'm always glad
to see a deserving woman honored. . .
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Heteronym
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
I'm still not interested in reading her.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Cleanthes
Member Avatar
Dinanukht wannabe
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
I can understand why Munro's fiction sounds unappealing to some. Munro's strength lies in the way she deals with content, not form: morals, manners, relationships, life, death, sex. Actual plot, as opposed to the concerns of more formalist, innovative writers, and this is not everyone's cup of tea

That towering mad genius, Szentkuthy, defends the formalist side against the content side particularly well on his Black Renaissance book.
Quote:
 

Over time, all the issues related to myth and philosophy end up as the subject for light movies, and this is not due to intentional derision, nor depravity, nor decadence, nor desire to blaspheme, but due to an intelligent realization. Because sooner or later it is discovered that the so called ancestral, deep, key problems only masked the impotence of small, perverted intellectuals, and that the only possibility to solve them was found in treating them as games.

Life is made up of two parts: unnamed objects, devoid of cause and purpose, and events, ie games. The facts of sex and death either are unimportant, things that exist but lack metaphysics and poetry, anonyma facta et indifferentes, as Pope Sixtus IV wrote, or they are our playthings, useful only to devise a style and provide movie plots, to frivolously use as ornamental and decorative backgrounds. Indifference or pratfall, those are the only choices for reasonable people. The symbolist smuggling of content is something better left to degenerate slaves.

And about form and formalism. I read just yesterday how 'in times of decay form takes precedence over content'. In fact, even a blind man realizes that the opposite is true: the great eras ultimately lack content and are only interested in form. The Baroque artists and petty bourgeois sentimentalist writers would give up even their last drop of blood for their most important, beloved thing: content.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DDR
Member Avatar
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
Heteronym
Oct 10 2013, 09:46 AM
I'm still not interested in reading her.
I'm with you, not appealing at all. I'm glad that a neglected genre like the short story was finally rewarded, but I'm sure there are better short story writers out there than Munro. I cannot stop thinking this is a Nobel Prize that should have ended in Antonio Tabucchi's persona a few years ago.

To me, Svetlana Alexievich would have been a better choice. She also belongs to a neglected genre (non-fiction) and her themes seems more relevant to depict contemporary human history.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
mandm
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
I like a lot of what I have read by Munro. However, there is a lot of truth in what this reviewer points out about the various formulae she uses.

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v35/n11/christian-lorentzen/poor-rose

I thought The View from Castle Rock was very well done and different from the other stuff I'd read by her.

Overall pleased, but part of that pleasure is an egotistical vindication (while knowing it's all nonsense anyway).

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
kline19
Member Avatar
worker bee
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Hmm... I hope they award it to Laszlo guy at some point in the future.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
byrd
Member Avatar
byrd is the wyrd
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
I haven't read any Munro yet, i've been meaning to for a while, but superficially at least this choice for the Nobel pleases me.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Funhouse
Member Avatar
Perpetually Lost
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
mandm
Oct 10 2013, 02:02 PM
I like a lot of what I have read by Munro. However, there is a lot of truth in what this reviewer points out about the various formulae she uses.

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v35/n11/christian-lorentzen/poor-rose

I thought The View from Castle Rock was very well done and different from the other stuff I'd read by her.

Overall pleased, but part of that pleasure is an egotistical vindication (while knowing it's all nonsense anyway).

I think The View from Castle Rock is really outstanding. I got it onto the English text list for final year students here in Victoria against opposition from other panel members who said it was too difficult, and I feel really chuffed about that. I hope the Nobel encourages more schools to select it.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
mandm
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Good for you, it really is excellent.

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
John Gargo
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Who didn't see this coming? :)

Quote:
 
Bret Easton Ellis @BretEastonEllis

Alice Munro was always an overrated writer and now that she's won The Nobel she always will be. The Nobel is a joke and has been for ages...
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
suzannahhh
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
John Gargo
Oct 11 2013, 09:35 AM
Who didn't see this coming? :)

Quote:
 
Bret Easton Ellis @BretEastonEllis

Alice Munro was always an overrated writer and now that she's won The Nobel she always will be. The Nobel is a joke and has been for ages...
he's such a creep
(and not a very good writer)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
byrd
Member Avatar
byrd is the wyrd
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
suzannahhh
Oct 11 2013, 09:45 AM
John Gargo
Oct 11 2013, 09:35 AM
Who didn't see this coming? :)

Quote:
 
Bret Easton Ellis @BretEastonEllis

Alice Munro was always an overrated writer and now that she's won The Nobel she always will be. The Nobel is a joke and has been for ages...
he's such a creep
(and not a very good writer)
I enjoyed American Psycho, but he got on the wrong side of DFW and I know who i'd rather side with on that issue.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
suzannahhh
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
byrd9999
Oct 11 2013, 09:54 AM
suzannahhh
Oct 11 2013, 09:45 AM
John Gargo
Oct 11 2013, 09:35 AM
Who didn't see this coming? :)

Quote:
 
Bret Easton Ellis @BretEastonEllis

Alice Munro was always an overrated writer and now that she's won The Nobel she always will be. The Nobel is a joke and has been for ages...
he's such a creep
(and not a very good writer)
I enjoyed American Psycho, but he got on the wrong side of DFW and I know who i'd rather side with on that issue.
I think he's consumed by jealousy
given his comments about other authors
(especially DFW)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
John Gargo
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Best not to get too annoyed with Ellis, and an extended view of his twitter page makes it obvious that he's mostly just content to play the contrarian... some of it is amusing, if predictable (calling the latest critical darling film "overrated," bemoaning the state of current cinema, vapid tabloid-obsessed observations that we wouldn't expect from a "real writer"). He occasionally will drop the act and say something genuine. He had this to say about The Goldfinch last month, for example:

Quote:
 

Bret Easton Ellis @BretEastonEllis

This is Donna Tartt's best novel. It's nearly 800 pages long and I've been savoring it for over a month. Inspiring.


So there is a person behind the persona, so to speak, but you have to navigate through all the mock-controversial posturing. :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
mandm
Member Avatar
Forum junkie
[ *  *  *  *  *  * ]
Who's to say that the positive stuff isn't part of his persona?

Plus, for a writer, how feable is it to just say someone is 'over-rated', given all the ambiguity that terms wields?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
alliknowis
Literary lunatic
[ *  *  * ]
John Gargo
Oct 11 2013, 12:54 PM
Best not to get too annoyed with Ellis, and an extended view of his twitter page makes it obvious that he's mostly just content to play the contrarian... some of it is amusing, if predictable (calling the latest critical darling film "overrated," bemoaning the state of current cinema, vapid tabloid-obsessed observations that we wouldn't expect from a "real writer"). He occasionally will drop the act and say something genuine. He had this to say about The Goldfinch last month, for example:

Quote:
 

Bret Easton Ellis @BretEastonEllis

This is Donna Tartt's best novel. It's nearly 800 pages long and I've been savoring it for over a month. Inspiring.


So there is a person behind the persona, so to speak, but you have to navigate through all the mock-controversial posturing. :)
He was classmates and friends with Tartt at Bennington by the way.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DealsFor.me - The best sales, coupons, and discounts for you
« Previous Topic · General discussion · Next Topic »
Add Reply